Amish buggies

Buggy signs, part 2

After regretting (on the original buggy sign post) that we had no Allen County, Indiana sign, reader Torey has kindly shared this photo, taken near the town of Grabill. You may be aware that Amish in Allen County are considered “Swiss Amish”.  Swiss Amish differ in a few ways from most other Amish (most Amish are considered to be of “Pennsylvania German” ethnicity). Swiss Amish…

Buggy Signs Across America

The familiar yellow buggy warning sign tells drivers “Amish ahead”. But there is no standardized design. So the signs you see can vary. Below, twelve examples of Amish buggy warning signs you’ll find across America – and one from outside our borders. From Dauphin County, near Elizabethville, Pennsylvania.  Dauphin County is home to a sizeable Lancaster Amish daughter settlement. Taken near the aptly-named Plainville, New…

Holmes County Road 77

Thanks to Mary for sharing the above photo of County Road 77 in Holmes County, Ohio.  You might recall CR-77 mentioned in the comments section of the Amish buggy safety post of a couple weeks ago.  Hurst and McConnell remind us that CR-77 is known locally as the “Amish roller coaster”, for its series of rolling hills.  You can kind of get a sense of that…

Buggies off the road?

29-year-old Eli Borntrager was killed on the road last year in Missouri.   Borntrager’s buggy was rear-ended by a driver traveling at 70 mph. The Amish buggy is not the safest form of transport.  For many reasons. Buggies can be difficult to see.  Horses can spook.  With their long bodies and front-set position, horses create a tougher sight angle when attempting to cross an intersection….

Do Amish have wings?

My Amish friend Aaron recently informed me of a curious entry into the Red Bull Flugtag contest. But first, Aaron had to explain what Flugtag actually is. Flugtag is a “flight” competition the Austrian energy drink* maker puts on each year. Teams ride homemade contraptions down a 30-foot high ramp, jumping and soaring into water below.  “Flugtag” (pronounced “flewg tallg”) means “fly day” in German,…

A lesson in humility on a buggy-buying trip

Dan McCarthy at the Great Leadership blog has kindly featured a guest post of mine, in which I discuss an important lesson of Amish business, taking my key from a visit to an Amish carriage shop.  Here’s the beginning;  follow the link to read the rest: I recently gave the teenage son of an Amish friend a lift.  Amish don’t drive of course, but generally…

Delaware Amish buggy

Rick shares a pair of photos from a Dover, Delaware Amish auction.  This first shot gives you an idea of what legroom is like in the back of a buggy.  Anyone ridden in something like this before?  Not too roomy. Rick also notes that the Dover buggies have a whip holder at the front, creating an unusual “antenna” look, which you’ll notice in the picture…

Amish buggy hazards

If you keep an eye on the news feeds, every couple weeks or so, a story about a road accident involving Amish pops up.  Reader Sherry recently wrote a moving post about such an accident in a Michigan Amish community.  Driving a buggy is a hazardous activity, more hazardous in some Amish settlements than in others. For example, the largely rural Amish communities of northern…