amish-home-bee-countyDid you know there are Amish in Texas?

Since the late 1990s, a community has existed near Beeville in Bee County. This is about a 2-hour drive from the Mexican border.

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As you can see in these photos, the climate and landscape here are rather different from what Midwestern Amish are accustomed to.




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This small community has some businesses and agriculture (including fig and citrus trees), but it’s not your typical Amish dairyland. Produce is grown with the help of irrigation. There is honey from beekeeping.

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Author Kelly Irvin has a collection of 21 photos of the Bee County settlement up on her Pinterest page. I’ve shared a few here; the top photo is by Bob Rosier from a previous photo post.

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The Bee County community is known for its annual school benefit auction (see photos from the 2015 edition).

The best-known business is probably Borntrager’s Combination Shop (pictured in the photo below; also see Kevin Williams’ video here), run by the settlement’s bishop.

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Amish have tried to settle in Texas multiple times since the early 1900s.

But as of today, Bee County is the only place you’ll find a permanent Amish presence in the Lone Star State. You can read more on this community here.