11 responses to Florida Haiti Auction, Kentucky Manure Standoff, Winter in Lancaster
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    ShipshewanaIndiana
    Comment on Thanks Ed (January 17th, 2014 at 08:36)

    Thanks Ed

    Ed those are wonderful pictures, thanks for sharing.

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    Randy
    Comment on Florida Haiti Auction, Kentucky Manure Standoff, Winter in Lancaster (January 17th, 2014 at 08:44)

    Is the manure on the highway any worse than the salt we dump on the highway every winter? Nice pictures.

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    Juanita Cook
    Comment on Florida Haiti Auction, Kentucky Manure Standoff, Winter in Lancaster (January 17th, 2014 at 08:56)

    Love seeing all the pictures. Thanks for sharing.

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    Andrea green
    Comment on Florida Haiti Auction, Kentucky Manure Standoff, Winter in Lancaster (January 17th, 2014 at 10:32)

    Thanks Ed, love the video and I have subscribed to your videos, great stuff, wonderful pictures , and a great read. :-)

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    Debbie H
    Comment on What is the danger? (January 17th, 2014 at 11:17)

    What is the danger?

    I do not understand the danger the manure causes. Yes it smells and draws flies. But old cars and trucks with leaky mufflers smell and pollute the air and give us asthma sufferers attacks. I do not see anyone having to prove they fix their leaking tail pipes to the city leaders.

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      Comment on Safety (January 18th, 2014 at 11:00)

      Safety

      I think the safety question has to do with Amish drivers having to stop and collect manure after every occurrence. In the one article I linked to above that seemed to be the implication. Not sure what the expectation would be otherwise…unless someone made regular runs through an area to clean up the manure, which doesn’t seem realistic at all. Right now I’m in a town which has a lot of horse-drawn tourist buggies and there is someone who regularly does this. Much smaller area to cover though.

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    Julie Turner
    Comment on Florida Haiti Auction, Kentucky Manure Standoff, Winter in Lancaster (January 17th, 2014 at 16:54)

    what is a silent auction?

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    TOM-GA
    Comment on silent auction (January 17th, 2014 at 21:13)

    silent auction

    Julie: a tag is attached to the item being auctioned with a place for your name and bid. any one can see your bid and bid higher if they want. At a certain time all bidding stops and the highest bid gets the item. Some times a phone number is requested and/or an address if the auction is big and a lot of people may not know one another.

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    J T
    Comment on Manure Problem (January 18th, 2014 at 13:06)

    Manure Problem

    These people need to get a life. It’s bio-degradeable and makes excellent garden compost. If it’s on the road it will soon be carried off by trucks and cars. If there is a big pile at the hitching post at Walmart the horses themselves will step on it it will wash away with the next rain.
    When I left the farm in 1972 to go off to college, the smell of the animal barn was what I missed the most.
    I think the English are much too occupied with horse S—. Get over it and move on…..

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    Comment on Florida Haiti Auction, Kentucky Manure Standoff, Winter in Lancaster (January 19th, 2014 at 11:08)

    Oh please — cleaning up the horse’s manure? Ridiculous!

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    Comment on 2014 Florida Haiti auction report (February 6th, 2014 at 07:03)

    2014 Florida Haiti auction report

    Have been meaning to post this for awhile but just getting to it now. A little report on the Haiti auction from someone who was there:

    The Haiti Benefit Auction had a very good turnout; over 1000 buyer numbers were handed out. The phrase that stuck out to me was an auctioneer’s “Let’s have an auction!” The approximate proceeds, $250,000.00, go directly to missions that directly help Haiti. The proceeds were higher this year than last year. The weather was sunny, with a cool north wind. People ate ice cream anyway, with their jackets on. The shrimp dinners on Saturday were a hit, kind of like stir-fry. On Friday evening, 1600 barbecued chicken dinners were served, plus enough catfish dinners, to equal 3100 dinners.

    We were so glad to see the wonderful doughnut-making family from Tennessee. I bought one to put in my vehicle to eat later. But I could feel the warmth of the freshly-made doughnut through the napkin in my hand, so I decided to eat half of it. Of course, I didn’t have the discipline to stop at half and ate the whole thing. You could watch the girls cut out a doughnut with an open, upside-down tin can, then bolt to quickly pull the dough to make a hole and a larger size “nut”.

    To everyone’s surprise, the highest quilt sold for $4,750. Of course it takes a backup bidder to get it that high, too. The rest of the story is that the King Size, Reach for the Stars Quilt, in Brown and Greens, was not even planned to be in the auction. But when the owner heard that they wished they had more quilts for the auction, she went home and brought it and donated it, as an afterthought, even though she didn’t think it was anything special.

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