65 responses to Who reads Amish fiction?
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    OldKat
    Comment on Haven't got a clue who reads them. (March 25th, 2013 at 05:21)

    Haven't got a clue who reads them.

    Interesting post though …

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    Susanmcq
    Comment on I do (March 25th, 2013 at 06:21)

    I do

    I live in New Jersey and I read them. I work in a public library and the books go out all the time. We are not far from Lancaster County so I am not sure if that increases the interest in the books. The problem is I think there are too many authors. Everyone seems to have jumped on the bandwagon because they are aware of the popularity. I try to stick to about 5 authors – my favorite ones are Beverly Lewis and Dale Cramer. It is good clean reading which is hard to find today.

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    New York State of Mind
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 07:01)

    I have read them for years. I have read every book that Beverly Lewis and Wanda Brunsletter have written plus more others. Most of the books I order in at the library. If I really like one of their books, I buy it and keep it.

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      Barbara Lee
      Comment on Amish Fiction (March 25th, 2013 at 11:43)

      Amish Fiction

      I prefer and so enjoy reading Amish fiction. If you haven’t read any of Beth Wiseman’s books about the Amish, I highly recommend her…great author…and she’s from Texas.

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      Jean Junkin
      Comment on Amish Fiction (March 25th, 2013 at 13:42)

      Amish Fiction

      I read Amish Fiction all the time. I have all of Beverly Lewis’s books and all of Wanda Brunstetter’s book. In all, I have a shelves filled with about 200 Amish books. I have my Kindle and Kindle Fire, so I’m not buying as many hard cover, but I love them all.

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    Rita
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 07:30)

    I do enjoy reading them, especially anything by Beverly Lewis. I’ve found, however, that some of them are written so awkwardly, with continuous explanations of language, etc, that it interrupts the flow of the story. And, thanks to this site, I’ve found some fairly obvious mistakes and misconceptions in many of the books. I agree with the comment of the model-perfect pictures on the covers – my Amish neighbors have a simple beauty that does not include mascara and blush and those plucked eyebrows.

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    linda
    Comment on who reads Amish ficture (March 25th, 2013 at 07:57)

    who reads Amish ficture

    They are my books of choice. Hardly read anything else. I find they not only have romance but mystery as well. I have a collection of approx 150, now I get them from my local library,I have some Amish neighbours/friends who I have lend books to as they enjoy them also.

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    Char
    Comment on I sure do! (March 25th, 2013 at 08:08)

    I sure do!

    I love Amish fiction. It all started when a friend loaned me 2 Beverly Lewis novels she got at a yard sale. I got the 3rd one from the library [it was a 3-book set] and I have been hooked ever since. I have read many other authors and have enjoyed almost all of them.

    The reading of Amish fiction got me interested in Amish NON-fiction. I have since read MANY non-fiction works by scholars [Kraybill, Hostetler, Wesner] and memoirs by current and former Amish [Wagler, Furlong, Miller, Garrett]. I have visited Lancaster County several times and Holmes County once [going again next week!!] I think I am fascinated by the culture and by the religious practices as well. I am a Christian and there is only one God [my opinion only – not trying to preach] I have great respect for other religious traditions and enjoy learning about them. I would love to learn the language. I speak some German but can hardly catch a word of spoken PA Deitsch. Reading it is easier as it gives me time to think and process the words!

    So, I am now and Amish nut for both fiction and non-fiction. I love getting to meet Amish people. They are just regular folks and confront the same issues of human nature that anyone else does.

    I would love to read Valerie’s book too. How about a giveaway?? 😉

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      Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 09:01)

      Char actually we do have a giveaway of Valerie’s book in the works, stay tuned.

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      Kay Fink
      Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 17:11)

      I live in SC but was originally from York, Pa. I love to read amish fiction. They are good, clean books.

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    Annette
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 08:10)

    Honestly, even as a Christian I rarely read Christian fiction. I did start out reading lots of Christian fiction, but eventually gave up. Amish fiction was the worst. The importance of Christian fiction is the theme and the “uplifting” part of it to most readers. It doesn’t matter how poorly written they are, the religious positivism is the most important thing. But that’s not the type of reader I am. I couldn’t stomach it.

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    SharonR
    Comment on Who reads Amish Fiction (March 25th, 2013 at 08:14)

    Who reads Amish Fiction

    I started reading Beverly Lewis’ books, about 2 years ago, after we visited Lancaster, PA, because I found myself very interested in their lifestyles, farming, religion, etc..This “Florida” girl had never been to Pennsylvania before and marveled over the vast farmlands and countryside, and had never seen horse and buggies on the roads, before!

    Wasn’t quite sure where to start, with seeking knowledge of the Amish & Mennonites, but my first book was a Wanda Brunstetter one, then I branched out to Beverly Lewis, which I have read every one of hers, and still reading them, as fast as she can write them…. I figured these two authors had some familiar knowledge about the Amish and Mennonites, and would start there.

    I thoroughly enjoy them, and find I, too, can’t put them down, once I start reading them. I think it also brought back some memories of my childhood in the 1950’s, as I found a lot of similarities, between the Amish and Mennonites “plain” living and my “English” family, too (when life was simpler)…These are books that inspire you, and can be a nice reprieve from other books……When there’s nothing on TV worth watching, (which seems most times!)…I pick up my latest Beverly Lewis book and read!
    SharonR

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    Anna
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 08:25)

    I love reading both Christian and Amish fiction but as I have learned more about the Amish Culture from Amish non fictional book and Amish friends I find that it bothers me when the author obviously did not do their research before jumping in. I know that it is fiction BUT I prefer the “facts” to be correct.

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      Jeanette Norton
      Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 12:41)

      I too want it to factual as far an Amish living.

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    Debbie
    Comment on Yes (March 25th, 2013 at 08:33)

    Yes

    I recently started reading Beverly Lewis’ books because they are clean, read no sex. I am a voracious reader and struggle to find clean fiction. I usually do not read romance books but after reading a book listed as an Amish mystery book which was full of foul language and very bloody I tried the romance books. Any one know of a good writer of clean mystery books?

    As to the inaccuracies in the books, its fiction, an escape into a fictional world. Isn’t that why we read fiction? Reading these books also led me to research the Amish which led me to this site. I agree that it seems everyone has jumped on the bandwagon.

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      Erin
      Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 10:29)

      I couldn’t have said it better! I am also an avid reader and truly enjoy getting lost in a good book. You’re exactly right that they are fiction and we’re aware of that. My admiration and interest in the Amish led me to this website/blog and also on many day trips across MN and WI. I love getting lost down a country road, visiting with the families, and supporting them by purchasing their goods.

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      Patricia Dugan
      Comment on Amish fiction (March 25th, 2013 at 12:09)

      Amish fiction

      As a church librarian I have purchased many Amish books that are fairly popular.

      For clean mysteries set in British surroundings Donna Fletcher Crow comes to mind.

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    Andrea
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 08:40)

    I do, i love reading my Amish books, Beverly Lewis rights the best i think? There are no personal goings on between the fictional carictors, which i think is great, most of all they make you think of how we live are lifes? Give a good moral story. Thats all i read is christian books none fictional and fiction , but the most important book that gets read everyday is the bible, thats my favourite. 🙂

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    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 09:04)

    I have read only one and that is because the author, Marlene Miller is a very good friend of ours. “Grace Leads Me Home” is the story of her life as she grew up English and when she married John, they joined the Amish church. I think everyone will enjoy reading her story.

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      Erin
      Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 10:26)

      I have not heard of this one. I will have to search for it at a used book store. Thanks!

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    Margaret
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 09:17)

    I do. The stories usually seem about a slower paced world than the one we live in. I’d say simple but maybe plain is a better word. Not just in dress. But hopefully about a community that is there to help one another when tragedy strikes.

    I don’t have to worry about 4 letter words and compromising situations. Sometimes the story gets dragged out and leaves the reader unfulfilled.

    We get a sampling of what farmingmreallynis or woodworking. Women generally stay home but they are equally as busy. Yet somehow folks get together for a quilting bee or to help put up a new barn.

    I would love to not only have the Dutch to English dictionary but a phonetic dictionary–so I know how to pronounce words.

    For me I just would rather a book that I know will fulfill my own fantasy, take me to another time and place so I can happily lose myself. I saw a really gruesome video lat week that was far more than mislabeled. If you want realism look up Tim Sappington from NM. You’ll get more than your dose of realism.

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    Char
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 09:17)

    Definitely enjoyed Marlene Miller’s book! Most others are written by folks who went the other way [left the Amish].

    Some good Amish mysteries are by P.L. Gaus and Linda Castillo.

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    Jessica M
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 09:17)

    Love Amish fiction! I have read many different authors and I enjoy most of them. I also enjoy reading lots of non-fiction Amish books. We don’t have much of an Amish presence down here in Texas so I like being able to imagine myself amongst them. But then… I also like YouTube videos of Amish country so there you go. 😉

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    Ed
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 09:50)

    One of the points the article Erik links to makes is that some Amish are reading Amish fiction, and when doing so, find their culture defined for them by outsiders. Many of the authors of this genre are evangelicals. I guess evangelical culture is so pervasive in American that it “seems” normal, even for many of us who don’t identify that way. For example, talk about having a “personal relationship with Jesus” or a character asserting assurance of salvation through faith alone, are widely accepted Evangelical concepts that are quite foreign to Amish theology.

    Still, at some point I’ll probably try and read one of these novels (though my track record at completing fiction isn’t very good, apart from Ayn Rand!). I’d be especially interested in reading any books by Amish authors, or by those who grew up in that culture.

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      Erin
      Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 10:36)

      I know that some Amish do read Amish fiction since I’ve seen posts and pictures with Amish women in them from Beverly Lewis and Wanda Brunstetter. I guess I have only asked one Amish gentlemen about it and he said that “They only write about us to make money.” I do agree, that there is some truth in that statement, but it has picqued my interest in them and now I enjoy visiting their districts and purchasing their baked goods and crafts. As far as making money, isn’t that true of many book topics?

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    Kim F
    Comment on I read Amish fiction (March 25th, 2013 at 09:55)

    I read Amish fiction

    I used to read the smut books as my children call them. I got a book of Suzanne Woods Fisher and have not read one of the other books I am totally hooked on Amish fiction. I am not afraid to leave it lay and have my kids get a hold of the book and read any of it. My 10 year old daughter reads them. And we have met Suzanne Woods Fisher. She is a great person.

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    Tammy N
    Comment on Amish Fiction (March 25th, 2013 at 10:09)

    Amish Fiction

    The thing about Amish Fiction that bothers me is there are hardly any “stand alone” novels. They just go on and on in book after book {sequels}. The authors just keep cranking them out until they all start to sound the same to me. Too…what they call “formulaic”. Good way for the author to make $$ I guess.

    I’ve got a book waiting now in my Kindle called “Until the End of Time” by Danielle Steel. She is not a “Christian” author but I’m looking forward to reading her take Amish Romance.

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      Debbie
      Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 10:57)

      Tammy,

      Some of us like sequels. I like them because you get to know the characters. Yes a lot of the Amish books sound the same but I personally think Danielle Steele’s books all sound the same. I guess it is personal opinions. We are all different in our likes and dislikes.

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        Tammy N
        Comment on Debbie (March 25th, 2013 at 11:32)

        Debbie

        I agree about Danielle Steel novels actually 😉 But, I have heard this one is different from the rest of hers, so I thought I might try it…see how she depicts the Amish Life.

        I don’t mean to be divisive or anything and I understand “clean reading” and all but if you’ve ever read the Holy Bible Old Testament there is murder and “gasp” sex~~can anyone say King David?? Granted we don’t get a play by play, except maybe The Song of Solomon {wink}….which I don’t agree with heavy sex scenes and bad words in novels, but you can always “skip” those parts as an old Grandmommy told me once.

        I’m just like a wide variety in my reading. There are some really good authors out there. Amish living is just one of my many interests…and I’m sure if the Amish Ladies and Men told the truth they have a liking for things that aren’t always on the Ordnung…haha!!

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          Loyd
          Comment on Amish Fiction (April 4th, 2013 at 04:58)

          Amish Fiction

          Tammy,
          I agree with you that there are probably things some of the Amish men and ladies would like to do that are not in the “ordnung”. Lets face it we are all human. Look at what Sam Mullet did with his people that led to the hair cutting incidents. I know it personally, because I grew up Amish and left when I was 18.
          If the authors want to write about the Christian life of the Amish it should include the good and the bad. Don’t get me wrong, I love the Amish, and have many uncles, aunts and cousins who are Amish.

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    AmyJo
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 10:13)

    yep, me too. I have around 170 on my kindle right now and recently gave away 37 paperbacks (oh, and a couple of hardback compilations of Beverly Lewis’ were in the mix also). I also read non-fiction re Amish and other things, of course. The “Amish Romance Novels” (ARN) (aka Amish inspirational) provide an escape for me – one that is “clean”, uplifting, and God-centered. I use to read that fictional writer who always writes about an attorney or such – drawing a total blank on the name (wrote The Pelican Brief). My sister had me listen to Patterson (I think that was his name). Good writers but, real life is, unfortunately, too close to that. I read to feel good and relax and gain hope. There are some ARN writers that write so poorly I just can’t read them or that have too much along the violence and suspense line that I don’t bother. “Life is grand” in these United States where we have the freedom to choose to read what we, individually, want to read!

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    Naomi Wilson
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 10:42)

    I tried Amish fiction. I listened to the first ten minutes of a Beverly Lewis novel on tape once, and just had to turn it off. I found it so shallow and contrived. On the other hand, someone recently gave me ten years worth of old Family Life issues. They are uplifting, help me keep a positive outlook about parenting and homemaking, and are enjoyed by the whole family when I read the articles out loud. I also enjoy the fiction published by and for the Amish through Pathway Publishers.

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    Kemily
    Comment on I do. (March 25th, 2013 at 11:28)

    I do.

    I absolutely love Amish romance novels, I rarely read anything but them. Although I don’t like Beverly Lewis’ novels, I do enjoy books from Beth Wiseman, Cindy Woodsmall, and Wanda Brunstetter. I admire their peaceful, simple lives and look forward to the day I also too find that.

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    Charlene Brown Beck
    Comment on I DO! (March 25th, 2013 at 11:34)

    I DO!

    I love the Amish fiction books especially the ones that deal more with salvation and committment. That is what I see in these novels, a simpler lifestyle with God fearing people at the heart of it. As one reader mentioned, it is something I would not be afraid to leave laying around for someone to pick up and start reading, not afraid of it being inappropriate or risque material for a younger person to approach.

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    Eva Schneider
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 11:53)

    Who reads Amish fiction?

    It is my first choice to read. I absolutely love learning anything about Amish. I do keep in mind its fiction, but it just seems like such a wonderful lifestyle. It makes me want to go up to the Amish ladies I see at Walmart and ask them questions. But I don’t think they would appreciate that. Lol! I love Amish Fiction!

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    Michelle
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 12:00)

    I didn’t use to read Amish fiction, until I ran across the first book in Beth Wiseman’s Daugters of the Promise Series a couple years ago. Once I read that one, I was hooked! I have read every book in that series and in her newer Land of Canaan series. When I get a new one, I end up staying up half the night reading because I can’t put them down. I love how she develops the characters and I think she helps the reader to really connect with them. I really find the stories of faith inspiring and uplifting!

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    Rita Ann Serpa~Leid
    Comment on I Think Many People Read It (March 25th, 2013 at 12:01)

    I Think Many People Read It

    I think quite a lot of ppl read these books, bc whenever I request them from either of two local libraries I nearly always have to wait a few days before they can get one to me.
    I LOVE the series’ and generational novels. And while reading those, I ALWAYS have to wait for the next one up.
    I never thought of guys reading them, but, I think it’s pretty neat that they are.

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    Pam
    Comment on I do! (March 25th, 2013 at 12:04)

    I do!

    I enjoy reading Amish fiction books. I have several authors I enjoy Cindy Woodsmall,Beth Wiseman,Mary Ellis,Jennifer Beckstrand,Kelly Long, Amy Clipson & Marta Perry just to name a few. These ladies all write interesting stories that are fun to read & often make me rethink my mindset on a certain situtations. If I’ve had a bad attitude that day with something. I think reading for enjoyment & relaxing is my sweet getaway but if I also learn something in the process Praise The Lord! I needed it.

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    TAMMY CUEVAS
    Comment on COMMENT ON WHO READS AMISH FICTION? (March 25th, 2013 at 12:11)

    COMMENT ON WHO READS AMISH FICTION?

    My mother and I both read Amish fiction, but for different reasons. She likes Christian fiction, and I find the Amish way of life interesting. However, I am aware that they are not always depicted accurately. And I agree with the comment regarding the covers; the women look more like professional models with each title. I hope to see an improvement in the genre; meanwhile, I will continue to read them and hope for the best.

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    Patti
    Comment on AMISH BOOKS (March 25th, 2013 at 12:16)

    AMISH BOOKS

    I have yet to find an Amish writer that I don’t like. Well not to crazy about P L Gaus. I am at the last few pages of The Mercy and love this book and all by her.
    God bless all who are reading this. Patti in VA

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    Comment on who reads Amish Fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 12:35)

    who reads Amish Fiction?

    I read them. I started with Wanda E. Brunstetter. She is a great writter. Then I saw other writers and started reading them. You start reading and can’t put them down. So I think it’s great that some Amish and men read them. Great stories. Thanks to all you writers and keep up with the great work.

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    Juanita Cook
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 12:40)

    I read all the Amish fiction books that I can get. I love reading the Amish books so much. It is very hard to put them down once you have started reading one of the books. Started with Beverly Lewis books first and then Sarah Price’s books next. Have been hooked on then every since then. I have loved all the books from the different Author’s, They are all really amazing Authors. Thank you all for writing such awesome books. ♥

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    Kathy Burdette
    Comment on Who Reads Amish Fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 12:44)

    Who Reads Amish Fiction?

    I think people who read Amish books are trying to get back to a simpler way of life. And with that they pass along the idea to family and friends; which in turn continues the domino effect. People desiring a better, way of life without the stress of “Englisher” life styles.”

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    Diane Dykstra
    Comment on Amish Reader (March 25th, 2013 at 12:50)

    Amish Reader

    Sarah Price is another awesome new Amish fiction writer everyone should check out her work she’s got some great series and also stand alone books.

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    Tom
    Comment on Amish Fiction (March 25th, 2013 at 12:50)

    Amish Fiction

    Being a male I have to admit that I read Amish fiction and have even read some romance novels. I started with just reading non fiction to learn more about the Amish and after reading so many I needed a break so I tried some fiction and than even picked up 1 or 2 romance. I’m very interested in reading “Grace Leads Me Home” since someone above has mentioned it as it has a different point of view from others I have read by Wagler, Furlong, etc.. I cannot say that I have a favorite fiction or romance author yet I just pick a book and read. I do agree with there being many inconsistancies in some of the books.

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    Naomi Martin
    Comment on Amish Reader (March 25th, 2013 at 13:03)

    Amish Reader

    I read Amish Fiction.I started out reading Beverly Lewis books and I was hooked.I like Shelley Shepard Gray as well,but I love all the authors that write them. I love the peaceful way of the Amish and learning about their ways.I have learned alot from reading Amish books.

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    Comment on I read it and now I write it (March 25th, 2013 at 13:09)

    I read it and now I write it

    I’ve always loved historical fiction. Reading about Amish life is like stepping back in time. I can answer the question about why there aren’t (many) Amish stand-alone titles: readers want to know what happens next! It’s that simple. My publisher is Kregel and my Amish fiction will be a first for them. Publishing is a business with some challenges in today’s world (like self-publishing), and Christian publishing faces additional challenges (scorn, for one). Why not give readers what they want to read? What sense would it make to give them what they don’t want to read? 🙂 For the record, I call my series Amish Historical Fiction because it’s set in the 70s, so there’s a twist for you.

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    Comment on I do! (March 25th, 2013 at 13:40)

    I do!

    I enjoy reading books in the Amish fiction/romance genre. The characters seem down to earth, and I enjoy the fact that there is no sex scenes in the books. It is difficult to find good romance books without explicit sex.

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    Cherie
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 14:05)

    Like SharonR and others have said, Amish fiction reminds me of the way I grew up back in the forties and fifties. Our values were similar to the Amish then, with men working outside the home and women working inside the home supervising the children and caring for the old folks. The Amish carry on those values that the rest of us abandoned. It’s all about the individual now (and material wealth as well) rather than God, family and community. I think that’s sad, and so I read stories about the way it used to be and wish it was again.

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      SharonR
      Comment on Amish Fiction (March 25th, 2013 at 15:07)

      Amish Fiction

      Your comments are so correct, Cherie — It would really take some determination and big changes for some of us to “go back” to those days, wouldn’t it?

      Not sure how old you are, but I think we are at the age now, that we appreciate the life and times, we once had! And these books help us cherish and remember them, plus by reading these books, they remind us that faith and values are still important in this day and age!
      SharonR

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      Debbie
      Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 16:31)

      Yes Cherie, I agree that some of us read them because it takes us back to that simple time. For me it was the 1950’s I was a child then and remember weekends at at grandma’s eating fried chicken and playing with my cousins. It was a carefree time for me. Not sure if it was for the adults but I felt loved and cherished.

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    Joan Whisenant
    Comment on I do! (March 25th, 2013 at 14:08)

    I do!

    I love reading them. I have my mom reading them too. I get a lot of them from the library for my kindle, so I can listen to them if I am busy. Keep them coming would be lost without them. Thank You from a big Amish book reader.

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    Rose
    Comment on Clean & Safe (March 25th, 2013 at 16:28)

    Clean & Safe

    My bookshelf is filled with Amish fiction for two reasons. #1, it’s my favorite genre to read. #2, I can leave these books on the bookshelf and not worry about my kids sneaking a glance and finding anything they shouldn’t.

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    Dawn L. Martinez
    Comment on Who reads Amish Fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 16:57)

    Who reads Amish Fiction?

    Anyone who likes a good book to read will read Amish fiction!!!!! 🙂

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    Bonnie Allen
    Comment on Who Reads Amish Fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 18:47)

    Who Reads Amish Fiction?

    I believe people who live in a fast pace life and are looking for relaxation read Amish fiction. They can’t get out to the country or really don’t have the time to take vacations as often as they’d like. I find with a stressful live reading Amish fiction calms me down and relaxes me. It is my zen UMM! 🙂

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    Naomi Wilson
    Comment on Nostalgic for the old days (March 25th, 2013 at 20:02)

    Nostalgic for the old days

    Many of today’s comments express people’s regret that our values and pace of life have changed. I guess Amish romance novels are an escape. (Kind of like this website offers me a quick escape from the rigors of mothering young children. It’s a bad habit I should probably change). Here is a quote from the (Amish) Pathway Reprint Series #9, Strangers and Pilgrims; Why We Live Simply:

    “You can’t turn back the clock.”
    “Satan is a liar. He has spread around many lies. He wants us to be influenced by them, and even to believe them and spread them to others. ‘We can’t turn back the clock’ is surely one of his lies designed to persuade people to accept situations they actually could and should do something about. The statement does contain some truth, as we have pointed out, as Satan’s lies usually do. He loves to mix truth and untruth-maybe even a lot of truth. As long as the overall conclusion, the final deduction, is false, he is satisfied.”

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    Anna
    Comment on which are best? (March 25th, 2013 at 20:39)

    which are best?

    I am a voracious reader and Amish fiction has passed through my hands. Some is better than others. I’d be interested to know from the Amish which author gives the most accurate depiction of their lifestyle (for wont of a better word). Thank you!

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    Comment on Very popular (March 25th, 2013 at 22:17)

    Very popular

    Amish fiction is very popular amongst Christian women here in Australia even though we don’t have Amish over here. We attend a conservative Baptist church and the novels are passed around amingst the women. I think because we are so removed we don’t need to worry about the inacuracies and it certainly encourages us farming wives in our day to day. I would rather read a Christian Amish fiction novel than any other kind of novel! I do think a balance in reading material is important though – it has grasped my interest in the Amish culture though which is why I am reading your blog!!!

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    Carolyn B
    Comment on Who reads Amish fiction? (March 25th, 2013 at 22:30)

    Wanda Brunstetter is my author of choice. The Amish genre has been overdone by many others. I’ll read Beverly Lewis, Wiseman, Shepard-Gray, Woodsmall as a break but love Wanda’s books best.

    As I’ve said before somewhere, Mrs Brunstetter was kind enough to send me two of her books a couple years ago when she found out I like her disabled heroine/hero novels best.

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    Melissa H
    Comment on My guilty pleasure... (March 26th, 2013 at 12:03)

    My guilty pleasure...

    I have to admit that the Amish genre is my guilty pleasure. I’ve bought, borrowed, read, and given away more books than I can count. Lewis, Brunstetter, Wiseman, Shepard-Gray, and many of the other authors keep me turning pages until late at night. I finally got to a point where I’ve limited myself only reading Amish genre books during the summer, so that I wouldn’t be to tired from staying up late to homeschool my children! My pre-teen daughter has gotten into reading the Amish-based books too. I’m thankful they are clean books that I don’t have to monitor before she reads them.

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    Don Curtis
    Comment on Amish fiction (March 26th, 2013 at 12:16)

    Amish fiction

    Well, I can hardly have any input on this subject as I don’t read hardly any books, anymore. The newspaper is about as far as I go. But, as most of you know my son, Mark, is Amish and a voracious reader. I asked him about reading Amish fiction. He said that he has a number of books of Amish fiction such as those published by Pathway Publishers. He does not, however, read Amish romance novels. He said that they almost make him “gag.” He told me that when he goes down the aisle at Walmart and sees these pictures of Amish girls with their Lancaster County prayer caps, plucked eyebrows, and Cover Girl makeup he just shakes his head. It especially offends him when former Amish write Amish romance books. The Amish weren’t good enough for them to stay Amish. But, the Amish are good enough to write stories about to make money. Anyway, those are Mark’s views. I’ve never read an Amish romance book and don’t plan to. Mark’s sister sent him a couple for Christmas a couple of years back. She thought because they had Amish people illustrated on the cover that he’d like them. He didn’t.

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    Don Curtis
    Comment on Futhermore (March 26th, 2013 at 12:22)

    Futhermore

    I forgot to mention that Mark is also offended when these Amish romance novel authors are touted as authorities on the Amish. For example back when they had the Nickel Mines schoolhouse shootings news reporters interviewed Beverly Lewis because she was an “authority” on the Amish. Mark said that’s like interviewing Tom Bosley who played Father Dowling on the Father Dowling Mysteries TV show as to who should be the next pope. If you want to interview an Amish authority then talk to an Amish person.

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    Jeannie
    Comment on Not Every Woman Reads them (March 26th, 2013 at 13:43)

    Not Every Woman Reads them

    I agree with Don Curtis, better to talk with the Amish in your community than take the likes of what you read in some Amish book as Authority especially fictional ones

    I personally do not like “romance” novels no matter the types of characters that are being written about.. It is my understanding that romance novels are just a way for so called Christian women to try and justify “lusting” and the stirring up of desires that I believe from scripture is wrong.

    Now for me, I have enjoyed reading the Amish series non fictional People Places books and have learned much and confirmed things when I have asked people of Amish, Mennonite background here in my neck of the woods…

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    Jeannie
    Comment on Thats my comment under neith Don Curtis (March 26th, 2013 at 13:46)

    Thats my comment under neith Don Curtis

    That was weird and do apologize, I jeannie wrote the following comment after Don Curtis not Don Curtis after himself.. I think it happened when I was tryin to leave a comment title saying I agreed with Don … again I apologize….

    I agree with Don Curtis, better to talk with the Amish in your community than take the likes of what you read in some Amish book as Authority especially fictional ones

    I personally do not like “romance” novels no matter the types of characters that are being written about.. It is my understanding that romance novels are just a way for so called Christian women to try and justify “lusting” and the stirring up of desires that I believe from scripture is wrong.

    Now for me, I have enjoyed reading the Amish series non fictional People Places books and have learned much and confirmed things when I have asked people of Amish, Mennonite background here in my neck of the woods…

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