This property is located in Maine, in the Whitefield community which started up several years ago. It’s the first Maine home we’ve looked at here. The home has a pretty unique look for an Amish home. First of all, it is clearly not an Amish-built home. The barn style is one clue to that.

Even bigger clues are the satellite dish and neutered electrical meter box attached to the home.

The blue color might have been appealing for this family when they bought it however. The color occurs in a big way inside, as you’ll see in the photos below. I don’t know if I’ve seen so much blue in an Amish home.

So you see above I’m calling this a “barn”-style home, but looks like the official term is “gambrel”. From the Zillow listing description:

4 BR Gambrel on 1.13 acres. Pasture and barn on nice level lot. Garden spot. Kitchen, LR, mudroom and bonus room. May need a septic system. Wiring has been disconnected. Furnace is unhooked but was working when they bought it. Woodstoves, wood shed and red shed don’t stay. No Sunday showings please.

That’s the first time I’ve seen a “no Sunday showings” notice on one of these homes, but I expect that most Amish homeowners would avoid showing their homes on that day. Also I could be wrong but “may need” a septic system reads to me like “definitely does need” a septic system. Also note they are taking some of the buildings with them when the place is sold. That suggests they are not moving very far, but on the other hand, maybe they really like those sheds.

This settlement, by the way, was founded by Amish from upstate New York – the large Swartzentruber settlement at Heuvelton. Maybe they’re moving back?

Let’s have a look inside starting with the kitchen. Here we see the characteristic blues – a lighter sky blue on door frames and other furniture pieces, and a darker blue for window coverings.

Zooming in:

Blue cabinetry and a view of the stove. Note the horseshoe hanging up at left.

Another angle, though this photo came out blurry.

Now the sitting room:

Closer look at sewing machine area. Is that the upturned top part of a hat I see? I also notice what looks like an old-style doctor’s scale tucked behind the cabinet. Actually there are several more interesting items in this zoomed-in shot.

Now another area with a sewing machine.

Shotgun hung up out of reach. Wine bottle in the lower right?

An area with another stove. Also notice the junior potty here. That’s probably a better option than the child of this age having to go outside to the outhouse every time. I’m also curious about what’s under the table. From what I can see it looks kind of like a security box of some sort.

This is the one bedroom photo provided (unless they’re counting one of the other rooms pictured as one of the four bedrooms). Particle board walls is what you call plain.

Glancing in the pantry:

Back outside, another view shows us a pulley clothesline:

Here we get a full look at an add-on likely installed by the Amish owners.

More of the property.

Horse barn and buggy shelter:

This home is 1,344 square feet in size, on 1.13 acres. Is this the most beautiful Amish home you’ll ever see? No, but it certainly is an interesting-looking residence, and shows a lot of the characteristic plain elements of this traditional group. It’s also an example of Amish buying and adapting an English home. Now it looks like it’s going back into English hands. So how much will you need to pony up if you want to get your hands on it?

The home is currently on the market for $79,500.

Amish Cheese

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