Amish Business Signs Across America

Some Amish companies spend a good bit of cash on advertising.  But for many, the simple roadside sign is the furthest extent of their self-promotion.

I’ve collected a few examples from around the country here. I wonder if you can tell which communities these are from.

There are 7 states represented in the 10 photos below. These images give you a sense of the range of Amish business–including the varying size and industries.

Who knows, you may have even been to some of these businesses.

amish country quilt shop

amish vegetables

amish furniture signs
Amish wood working ahead

amish fabrics

amish engraving

amish baked goods

amish vinyl products

amish country store

amish wellspring

produce sign amish

For more, check out this little piece on typical Amish businesses.

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    30 Comments

    1. Simple Business Signs

      Some of these remind me of home-based business signs here in bilingual New Brunswick. I see a couple on the road into Grand Falls – “couvertes” (quilts) and “bas” (socks.)

    2. Barbara Michels

      Is the first picture located in Indiana. Either Shipshawana or LaGrange ?

      1. You’re very close Barbara. That’s actually Nappanee area.

    3. Lattice

      I’ve definitely seen the second one before, or else a nearly identical one. Maybe Ethridge, TN?

      1. Bingo! That might be my favorite one here. Just something about it.

    4. Amish Business Signs

      The fourth, sixth and last photo remind me of Oregon quite a bit…because those are the typical signs we see out in the country 🙂 🙂 :)I know there are Mennonites in the arera, but I’m not sure about Amish…so my guess is probably far off. Have a great day. Greetings from the ocean shores of California, Heather 🙂

      1. Heather there used to be Amish in Oregon dating back to the 1800s but no longer.

    5. Robust

      Amish Wooden Signs

      I can’t say I know where any of them are located but I have always been a fan of quality wooden signs and the Amish do an excellent job.

    6. George

      Nice photos as always!
      As far as the one of Windsor Country Store, I must admit, I could not have resisted the temptation to restore the sign to it’s full hanging position.

    7. Forest

      If Im not mistaken, the Windsor Country store photo is from the Union Grove Settlement in NC

      1. That is correct Forest, nice job.

    8. Slightly-handled-Order-man

      I notice that none of the signs indicated specifically that the businesses are Amish. Thoughts on that, anyone?
      Nice scenery.

    9. Al in Ky.

      When I was in the Munfordville, Ky., settlement last Sat. I think
      I drove past the seventh sign. I’m pretty sure the ninth sign
      is from Shipshewana, Ind. I was at the 850 Center on Nov. 19. They
      were having a large Christmas sale with many Amish vendors at the
      850 Center — and a free grilled hamburger lunch! The tenth
      sign looks like one I’ve seen in the Sonora/Upton, Ky. area.
      The fourth one looks like Jay Co. or Adams Co. Indiana. The fifth
      one looks like the Arthur, Ill. area.

      The second sign was so interesting to me, because it looks just
      like the signs I’ve seen in the Orange Co. Ind. Swartz. settlement.
      It’s interesting to see the difference in signs in Swartz.
      settlements such as Ethridge and Orange Co. as compared to
      signs in higher order settlements like Shipshewana.

      I really enjoyed this post and hope you have more where we can
      guess where the pictures came from.

    10. Well done

      Wow Al, nice job! You are 4 for 5 on your guesses. The only one you were off on was the 5th which is actually also a Nappanee sign. I was impressed you got the Hardin County KY Produce sign right.

      There is a big difference in these signs, quite a contrast in some of them as you note (ie #9 and 10).

      Looks like the only ones left un-guessed are #3 and #6.

    11. Chelsea

      I am going to guess that #3 is from Wayne Co./Holmes Co. Ohio border. That sign and corner look very familiar…

      1. Chelsea, that is right, it is from the Holmes/Wayne community. I am almost 100% sure this was in Wayne Co, but cannot remember if it is on the border or not.

    12. Ed

      The word "Amish" on signage

      I understand that the Amish will not use the word “Amish” to advertise or name a business. They consider it prideful. In fact any business calling itself “Amish” is almost certainly run by non-Amish, althoguh it might count Amish workers amongst its employees. On the other hand, the Amish don’t seem to mind others using the word “Amish” to promote a business.

      In this age of strong copyright and trademark laws, and high-profile disputes over brand names, the Amish attitude towards their own name is refreshing. Paradoxically, it makes it somewhat easier to identify a “real” Amish business — just look past those trumpeting the word “Amish” and look for a handmade sign!

    13. Jessica

      I wonder if I was the only one to notice that one of the signs, after listing lots of different home cooked foods, as the last item on the sign lists a DEAD END! =:oo Um, I think I’ll pass stopping there. 😉

    14. Adair

      The second one certainly looks like the ones I saw in Tennessee

      1. Exactly right Adair. The only one that hasn’t been guessed is #6. A hint: this state hasn’t been mentioned yet.

    15. Kate

      Fourth sign

      Would the fourth sign be from Berne IN?

    16. Ann

      Signs

      A couple comments on signs: I know of a business owned by Old Order
      Amish who have the word Amish in signage for their business located in Geauga Co., Ohio but it is rare. There are also many Amish owned business that do not have signs and thus you must know where they are located. When I asked my taxi customers why, they listed a couple reasons – Some church districts evidently limit signs, sizes and placement. The most frequent reason seems to be that these business are very Amish oriented (used clothing, fabric, bulk food for example) and don’t want to attract interest from tourists.

      1. Amish shops with no signs

        Ann, interesting to hear. I found the last reason to be the case with one sign-less shop I visited this summer. Don’t know if I qualified as a “tourist” or not, but had a very nice talk with the owner 🙂

        1. Ann

          respons to Eric

          Eric, I have always found the Amish in retail establishments (with signs or without) to be open and friendly. I have been in one unsigned Amish used clothing resale shop but have not gone into any others. Not that I didn’t feel welcome but even though I dress conservatively I don’t ewear “Amish” style dresses so I feel that if I go in and poke around I’m a lookie-loo and I feel that is disrespectful. My personal feelings, not something anyone has ever indicated to me.

          1. Friendly Amish businesspeople

            Ann that is an interesting response, I think you are right it is generally the case that Amish business owners like other businesspeople are accommodating to visitors.

            That said I know some folks that are introverts and not really “people people” at all. I’ve only felt semi-unwelcome on one or two occasions in an Amish business (the one I’m thinking of was just a run-of-the-mill variety/food store, and wasn’t really more than a blunt “can I help you” response, which may have been the person’s manner to begin with), and I’ve been in fabric shops and others where men wouldn’t be so common to go, typically getting a friendly response (I usually buy something as well, so maybe that helps!)

    17. jon

      Lol

      lol that’s a very creative sign. We should try this with a neon sign so it can be seen at night 😉

    18. Al in Ky.

      For sign #6 I’ll guess St. Joseph or Branch County, Michigan (or somewhere else in Michigan).

      1. It’s a good guess Al, this is actually in PA. Either way I’m impressed by the collective knowledge of these signs!