Have A Look At This $18,400 Amish Buggy

This Amish buggy sold for $18,400 at a recent auction

Ten years ago, we had a look at a $9,861 Amish buggy seen in a PA community. This one is nearly double that price. Conclusion: Inflation is hitting the Amish hard too!

Well, maybe not just inflation. This buggy comes loaded with some flashy features (at least in Amish terms). So a chunk of the price tag likely reflects those add-ons. Remember this is something you won’t see in all Amish communities. In some of the more progressive areas, they do permit buggies with interiors like this.

The photos and info here are courtesy of reader Jerry. He found this buggy at the recent Gratz, PA Mud Sale. Here’s Jerry’s description of the features on this one:

The first buggy sold was new and loaded with high tech. Rechargeable Dewalt battery LED lights, encased hydraulic disk brakes, air bags suspension and torsion bar axles. It also sported various decorative elements and high-end interior components.

“Air bag” suspension on an Amish buggy

Place foot here to get a leg up.

The interior has a modern country rustic look to it. The piece of “high-tech” you see there is probably a speedometer/clock unit. I do like those cup holders. Simple sleek and fit the overall design.

The duotone seat, strapped down for the time being.

Jerry breaks down the price details here:

It sold at auction for $18,400.00. The consignors have the option of selling with a reserve. This one surpassed the reserve by $400.00. Purchases are not subject to the 6% PA sales tax at benefit auctions and the buyer saved $1,104 by buying here. Also, destination charges ($200 to $400) does not apply.

Jerry made sure he got the price right: “when the buggy sold for 18.4K, I asked the group of Amish men I was standing near, if I heard that number correctly and one replied, ‘Yes and that doesn’t include the horse!'”

So this is the most expensive buggy I can recall ever coming across. But keep in mind this is definitely on the higher end of what Amish buggies will go for, reflecting a more progressive group. Visit a more traditional community where buggies are much plainer with many fewer features, and you’ll expect to pay a fraction of this cost.

Finally, to give you an idea of what other sorts of features are available, I’m re-sharing this feature list from a Lancaster County coach shop (from the 2014 post linked above). No doubt it is longer than this today.

Inside an Amish Buggy: How it all works

Finally, if you missed it, I’ll take the opportunity to repost the video I did showing the interior of an Amish buggy, and explaining what all the knobs are for, and the different features like blinkers, brakes, power source and so on.

Get the Amish in your inbox

Join 15,000 email subscribers. No spam. 100% free

    Join the Amish America Patreon for bonus videos & more!

    Similar Posts

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    5 Comments

    1. john

      Amish Buggy

      This was what they could call the Cadillac/Rolls Royce of Amish Buggies I wonder if the company that makes floor protectors makes custom floor covers for the carpeting. All they need is a small heater for the winter time and they are all set.

    2. Guest

      Shag carpet!

      Seems ungodly

    3. Boyce Rensberger

      Worldlier and worldlier

      Between this and details from the Ben & Erik Show I sense a trend. Maybe some day we’ll see hybrid buggies–using a battery-powered electric motor to help the horse get up steep or long hills. Maybe even with regenerative braking on the downhill run.

    4. Rod

      Steel spoke wheels

      I was surprised to see brakes only on the front axle. Hydraulic brakes would be wonderful on all four corners. Either way, it sure beats the old rub brakes on the wood spoke buggies I’m used to seeing. The ride of those airbags would be nice to experience. I wonder if they are adjustable? This buggy would be a smooth ride on asphalt, and it would be much more comfortable on dirt o roads too!
      So with a good harness, and a decent horse, you could easily top $30,000. That is quite a bit of money in my area. Hope they enjoy it.

    5. Kensi

      Quite worldly

      And they’re supposed to be unworldly. LOL!