Tennessee Amishman Arrested In Possession of 25 Pounds of Marijuana, Guns, Cash

This is a bizarre story out of the Ethridge, Tennessee Amish settlement. A 33-year-old Amishman has been arrested for possession of 25 pounds of marijuana. Lawrence County police also seized firearms and an undetermined amount of cash. The report from News 4 Nashville:

LAWERENCE COUNTY, TN (WSMV) – Lawrence County police officers located 25 pounds of marijuana in the residence of an Amish Lawrence County man on Monday.

According to police, Chris Appleby,33, was arrested after police executed a search warrant in his home on Denson Road in Northern Lawrence County.

In addition to the 25 pounds of marijuana that was found in two separate outbuildings, police state that guns and cash were also seized.

Appleby was arrested and taken to the Lawrence County Jail.

Two things make this odd. One of course is the drugs. It’s not often that the Amish are involved in anything to do with drugs, in particular their sale. The sheer amount of marijuana involved here along with one of the multiple charges he faces – “Possession of Schedule VI for Resale” – strongly suggest this was someone involved in distribution of the drug.

Image: Lawrence County PD

This recalls an infamous 1998 case in which two Lancaster County Amishmen became involved in selling cocaine and methamphetamine in coordination with a motorcycle gang. The men in that case were about a decade younger than Appleby. It led to greater oversight and emphasis on youth behavior in the Lancaster County community. Besides that one, I’m not aware of many cases were Amish people were involved in large-scale drug dealing.

The other odd thing here is the man’s name. Appleby is not a traditional Amish surname. This suggests that he must have been a convert to the group. Joining the Amish is not common, and though I lack data on this, I suspect it is less common among the plainer Amish groups. The Ethridge Amish are a Swartzentruber community, which is basically the most conservative of Amish groups.

The only other thing I can think of is – is it possible that this man was misidentified? As most Amish, and in particular the most conservative, tend to not possess photo identification, could it be that he provided officers a false name? I doubt that is the case, as there would be other documentation that could be used to establish the man’s identity, and the authorities here are certainly well-versed in figuring out who exactly they are dealing with.

I admit being a bit puzzled by this story. In the arrest photo provided, the man clearly has the appearance of a Swartzentruber Amishman by his dress and hair. And it’s not unheard of that Amish people have gotten involved in drugs – they are not immune – and even in selling them. But a lot of questions remain. How did this man come to be involved in – allegedly – dealing drugs? Was this something that he brought with him into the community, assuming that he is a convert? And how did authorities become aware of what was going on here?

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    32 Comments

    1. gregory chad stutzman

      Not a shocker...

      I grew up with Amish guys. They are no strangers to pot and guns.

      1. Guns are widespread among the Amish of course, with many farmers and avid hunters.

        Pot I can speak less of, though of course there is drug use by some. Sounds like it was common in the community you grew up in.

        But an Amish dealer, not so common. Or at least not often made public. I don’t think this guy was some sort of drug lord, but 25 lbs is more than just dealing a bit to friends.

    2. Yoder in Ohio

      Chris is a Convert

      I know of Chris. He is a convert to the Amish.

    3. Amish man arrested.

      There is something wrong with this story, and/or picture.
      The last name is not an Amish name, and the picture of the room with the drugs is not Amish either.
      He either gave a false name, or else it’s an “English” person posing as an Amish man. (I suppose anything is possible for a drug dealer )
      He looks unusually comfortable at the camera for a Swartzentruber Amish person. ?

      1. I went over some of that in the post. Most likely a convert, and Yoder in Ohio who is a trusted source here has confirmed that.

        So he’d be more comfortable with the camera coming from the English. But if you look at other mug shots involving Amish, some are not unlike this one (some do show visible shame/discomfort however).

    4. Yoder in Ohio

      The Name

      I know of Chris Appleby. He is a convert to the Amish.

      1. I figured so. The only other option I considered is that he was maybe second-generation, with one or both parents having joined the Amish.

    5. J.O.B.

      Does anybody know how the Amish in that area will respond to this?

      Chances are there are other Amish involved in what he was doing but didn’t get caught.

      Removing serial numbers from a gun is a felony and also shows this guy probably has experience doing this for some time. He’s most likely not a “rookie.”

      There are Amish who drink and do drugs. But it seems some do a better job at keeping a low profile when they do.

    6. Amish in Ohio have to have picture ID to drink in bars. They are not immune to drug used not any different than you or I. Just my 2cents.

    7. Paula

      ???

      Could it be that an English acquaintance was using his outbuildings as stash houses? On the other hand, how did the police come to suspect him? Or was he arrested simply because it was on his property therefore in possession & charged?

      Hmmmmmmmmmm…….

    8. Jeremiah

      Convert

      I have also heard of him. As I understand, he joined the Abe Miller church. Not the “Abe Miller” Swartzentruber subgroup but the movement that broke away from the Swartzentrubers 50+ years ago and that fellowships with Kenton, Ohio. They have quite a few converts. One of those recently left the Abe Millers and is/was considering to go over to the Swartzentrubers in North Carolina. I don’t know I’d these cases are connected.

      1. Thanks for the additional details Jeremiah – I asked a couple sources about this as well.

        One question – I may be getting mixed up or maybe I need to update my Swartzentruber subgroup knowledge. I was aware of three of them – Joe Troyer, Mose Miller, and Andy Weaver Swartzentruber. The Jeck Jecky group I understood to not consider themselves Swartzentruber, even though others might. But is there also an “Abe Miller” subgroup within the Swartzentrubers (not the Abe Miller group which fellowships with Kenton)? That’s what I understand by your comment. Maybe one more recent? I want to say it rings a bell, but then I think I may just be thinking of one of these other groups and that maybe there was a bishop with that name as well in one of them.

        1. Jeremiah

          Abe Millers

          More than fifty years ago there was a split in the Swartzentrubers. I don’t know for sure about the name but I assume the primary leader of this group was Abe Miller. Much like the Jeck Jecky group, they no longer consider themselves Swartzentrubers. The reason the Swartzentrubers also view them as not-Swartzentruber is because numerous of the first families who had recently joined the Swartzentruber fellowship.

          Since that time the Abe Millers have distinguished themselves by putting away tobacco and bed courtship, and by rejecting the sprayers in the field. (I assume they are referring to a small motor-driven sprayer used by farmers for spraying pesticides.)

          Being a small group — only three congregations, that I am aware of — they sought fellowship elsewhere. Kenton was most similar to them. As I understand they are in full fellowship with Kento and the other churches in that circle. But, as I’ve heard, Kenton would require the Abe Millers not to excommunicate a member who moved over to them or a closely related congregation even though the Abe Millers want to excommunicate anyone who would leave their group (because of the Swartzentruber mentality).

          The Abe Millers are a very interesting group, and because of their zealous conservatism, strong visible identity, and traditional lifestyle they have attracted a number of converts.

          They have somewhat of their own subgroup identity but they go with the Kenton churches.

          1. Thanks for the additional info about the Abe Miller group Jeremiah, some interesting additional detail specifically the excommunication expectations. So the way your original comment was written it sounded to me like there was a second “Abe Miller” group within the Swartzentruber world, but it looks like I may have misunderstood the comment, so I think that clears it up. And I’ve heard from another person the same thing, that he believed Appleby joined the Abe Miller church.

            1. Jeremiah

              It’s my pleasure.

              I understand why you understood my original comment as suggesting that there is a second Andy Weaver Swartzentruber group — when there is a split within the Swartzentrubers, they are typically understood as two different Swartzentruber factions, especially when the groups remain quite conservative. But sometimes, including this case, the Abe Millers see themselves as different enough from the parent group that they don’t want to be identified as Swartzentruber. Of course, it probably strikes us as somewhat unusual that recent “converts” to the Swartzentrubers would so quickly break away and refuse to identify as Swartzentruber but that’s what happened, for whatever reason. Apparently the Swartzentrubers weren’t what they expected.

              A parallel could be drawn with the “Beachy Amish.” For a time, they were known as a type of Amish. But with time, the Old Order Amish didn’t extend the Amish identity to them, and the Beachys themselves didn’t want the Amish label (because they associated it with strict shunning or tobacco use or lack of missionary outreach or wild young folks or whatever) and now mainly label their churches as Mennonite or Fairview “Christian Fellowship” etc.

              The Abe Millers “go with” the Kenton churches because of the traditional lifestyle they share in common plus better standards regarding tobacco and courtship practices but are still known by the Abe Miller label because of their unique identity and practices, for example, the Swartzentruber haircut and other small identifiers like that.

              I find that diversity exceedingly interesting. It reflects the diversity and freedom of humanity to build cultures dynamically.

              1. Larry Clarence Lewis

                Diversity Among Traditional Old Order Groups.

                Dear Jeremiah,

                I am grateful to you for the detailed knowledge you have shared about the Abe Miller Group, the Swartzentruber Amish, and the Kenton Ohio affiliation. I also have a very strong interest in these particular traditional Amish groups, together with the several sub-groups of Swartzentrubers, the several Nebraska Amish groups, the two Byler Amish groups, the Paoli Amish, as well as several traditional Old Order Mennonite groups. In Canada, where I live, we have three settlements of Swartzentruber Amish, two of Troyer Amish, and several of traditional Old Order Mennonites. Judging from your detailed knowledge of the Abe Miller Group,, I would very much like to correspond with you concerning the diversity among these groups you have come to know. Please do not feel pressured. My email is larkat1943@icloud.com. Sincerely, Larry Clarence Lewis, Ontario, Canada.

                1. Jeremiah

                  Paoli

                  Paoli is a special case. They pulled out of Northern Indiana (Lagrange County area) back in the 1950s, as I understand. They are particularly conservative. They fellowship with Kenton and with the Abe Millers. Young men have haircut half way over the ear, so they’re not Swartzentruber. They will help the Swartzentrubers at a work bee, as long as tobacco doesn’t appear. They are particularly opposed to bar codes and allowing their ministers to be listed in the German calendar. And they don’t subscribe to the Budget because it has a bar code. They are extraordinary friendly, quite intelligent, and extremely plain. A very interesting group.

                  1. Larry Clarence Lewis

                    Paoli Amish

                    Dear Jeremiah

                    Thank you for taking the time to respond to my note to you. This is the kind of detailed information which is not easy to come by, and which I particularly value. I only know about the Paoli Amish because of the books, An Amish Patchwork and Plain Diversity, by Steven Nolt and Thomas Meyers.
                    You mentioned that the Paoli Amish are very friendly. I read in one place that they are open to seekers. Have you found this to be true? Do they have some converts like the Abe Millers? Have you visited this community? My travelling days are long over. Back in the late 80s and early 90s, I did travel around quite a few areas of the traditional groups of Amish, including the Swartzentrubers of Ethridge Tennessee. It was at that time I first heard about the Abe Miller Group, but, over the years I heard next to nothing about them until you wrote about them.

                    Many thanks for your kindness.

                    Sincerely,
                    Larry Clarence Lewis
                    Ontario, Canada

                    1. Jeremiah

                      Paoli Amish

                      Yes, in a way, they are friendly to seekers. They have had several singles/families try to join. One family moved in just before the year 2000. A Paoli acquaintance commented that he feels they moved to their community due to fear of what might happen at the turn of the millennium, and we’re hoping for off-grid security. I know a single man tried to join a few different times. They asked him to abandon some type of investment account, and he wasn’t willing to withdraw it early because of the financial penalty for taking an early draw. I can’t give an exact number, how many tried to join but it was more than a few.

                      A unique practice in the Paoli community is that all males go around and shake the hand of all the ladies before church starts. I’ve never seen this practiced anywhere else. It shows that ways can be changed if people want too, and considering their serious conservatism the rules can become more conservative too. Not all change goes in the liberal direction.

                      It seems to me that the men always wear a vest when outside, even during daily work.

                      A friend once met a Paoli youth on the bus and found him extremely engaging and interesting. The most important topic was matching pulley sizes and belt lengths to get shop tools to properly run off a diesel powered lineshaft. Sounds like they have a budding mathematician.

                      1. Larry Clarence Lewis

                        Paoli Amish Continued.

                        Dear Jeremiah,

                        Once again, thank you for filling me in on the Paoli Amish. Your knowledge is extensive, and, I believe, firsthand. Thank you very much for sharing it.

                        I was very interested to learn that the men shake the ladies’hands before the church service. I have not come across this before. I am only familiar with the men greeting one another, with a distinction made between the baptized and unbaptized.

                        You did say that a fair number have tried to join the Paoli Amish, but they didn’t persevere. Are you aware of any who have persevered?

                        Can you describe the buggies of the Paoli Amish? All I have been able to find out is that, like those of the Swartzentrubers, they do not have storm-fronts nor battery-operated lights. Are their buggies the same shape as those of the Swartzentrubers? Also, I believe they eschew the orange/red triangle slow-moving vehicle sign; like the Swartzentrubers, do they outline the back of their buggies with silver reflecting tape? Are their kerosene lanterns at different heights on either side of the buggies, do they employ only one lantern? Do their buggies have any windows at the rear and/or the sides?

                        With regard to the whole spectrum of technologies, do the Paoli Amish draw the same lines as the Swartzentrubers, or, are there differences?

                        Finally, Nolt and Meyers state that the Paoli Amish limit casual interaction with the surrounding society. I also read somewhere that they don’t go into town as a family, but only one member of the family will go into town to purchase what is needed, and these trips are kept as infrequent as possible. Can you comment on this?

                        Thank you for your kindness and patience.

                        Sincerely,
                        Larry Clarence Lewis
                        Ontario, Canada.

                    2. Jeremiah

                      Paoli cont. cont.

                      Yes, I have been to church in Paoli. The people were extremely friendly. We sat out in the yard into the late afternoon visiting.

                      Among the Amish, I have not noticed a distinction between baptized and unbaptized, except that maybe the youth boys tend to be a bit reluctant to shake everyone’s hand. Something which is unique in Paoli (compared to other Kenton churches, as well as the Swartzentrubers and Andy Weavers) is that all baptized members greet one another with the holy kiss. In Kenton and most Andy Weaver churches, the holy kiss is reserved to the ministers, and sometimes older male members of the congregation and between lay members at communion.

                      I am not aware of any seekers that persevered. As friendly as the Paoli Amish are, there is still an enormous gap between their lifestyle and the lifestyle of mainstream society. Take an office worker and throw him on a conventional farm, and multiply the change by five, and that’s roughly the amount of change required for a mainstream American to fit into the Paoli lifestyle.

                      Paoli ended up following the “Ohio” style (rather than the more complicated, and less “plain,” Indiana style) with reflective tape around the edges of the buggy like the Swartzentrubers have. I can’t think of any difference between Paoli and Swartzentruber buggies except that I believe Paoli uses two lanterns. Yes, the Paoli Amish refuse to use the SMV emblem. I don’t remember seeing any windows in their buggies. There could be a small window on the back or sides (like in the Kenton-type churches) but I really don’t remember.

                      Technologically, there aren’t many differences. I’m sure there are quite a few minor differences but only true insiders know those things. For example, I visited numerous Swartzentruber communities and chatted with various members but it wasn’t for maybe ten years that I first found out that they don’t allow dust collecting machines in their shops. It never occurred to me that they would take exception to dust collection in their shops, especially since those can easily be driven by a lineshaft.

                      “Finally, Nolt and Meyers state that the Paoli Amish limit casual interaction with the surrounding society. I also read somewhere that they don’t go into town as a family, but only one member of the family will go into town to purchase what is needed, and these trips are kept as infrequent as possible. Can you comment on this?”

                      I don’t know the answer to this question. I would say they are quite reserved and shy toward outside society, and they limit their technology and expenses to be as much on the family farm as possible but I don’t know about travelling to town, how frequently they do this or in what arrangement. Sorry.

    9. Joe Donnermeyer

      Likely an evidence room or at police headquarters

      It appears to me that the picture shows all of the assembled evidence (including what looks like a semi-automatic) at the police station. Perhaps in an evidence room in the basement since attribution for the picture is the Lawrence County PD. So, it makes sense that the room does not look Amish.

      1. Thank you Joe – I forgot to respond to that part. I agree fully with what you wrote here.

    10. Jeremiah

      Additional information

      GoodWordNews adds this:

      “Detectives said they had received complaints from the Amish community about Appleby.”

      1. Larry Clarence Lewis

        Diversity Among Old Order Groups.

        Dear Jeremiah,

        I am grateful to you for the detailed knowledge you have shared about the Abe Miller Group in particular, but also about the Swartzentruber Amish and the Kenton, Ohio affiliation in general. I also have a very strong interest in these traditional Amish groups, which extends to the several sub-groups of Swartzentruber Amish, the five groups of Nebraska Amish, the two groups of Byler Amish, the Paoli Amish, as well as several traditional Old Order Mennonite groups. In Canada, where I live, we have three settlements of Swartzentruber Amish, two or three of Troyer Amish, and several of traditional Old Order Mennonites. Judging from your detailed knowledge, I would be very interested in corresponding with you to pool what we both know about these very interesting and instructive diverse groups. Please do not feel pressure. My email is larkar1943@icloud.com, or, I am available on FaceBook.

        Sincerely,
        Larry Clarence Lewis
        Ontario, Canada.

        1. Larry Clarence Lewis

          Paoli Amish Continued

          Dear Jeremiah,

          Your last correspondence with me is not accessible. I received it by email in the usual way with a link. The link brought up the main article; then, I went to where we have been going back and forth in the Comment section. The last entry there is my last correspondence with you, but your reply, “Yes, I have been to church in Paoli….” is not found there, and it does not allow a Reply any longer. As you might expect, I only received one sentence of your reply, not all of it, in the email. I am wondering if one can only go back and forth a limited number of times, and then it no longer takes a message. For this reason, I am sending a message to you at this entry, hoping it will get through to you.

          I would like to continue our correspondence, should you care to. As you can tell, I am very interested in the Paoli Amish; indeed, I have been very interested in them from the time I first read about them. Should you wish to continue the conversation, I could tell you of my experience attending a Swartzentruber Amish service here in Ontario. I have also attended services of the Noah Hoover Old Order Mennonites near Scottsville, Tennessee, as well as the very traditional Orthodox Old Order Mennonites(Elam Martin Group) here in Ontario. Many years ago, I visited a family of Swartzentruber Amish around Ethridge, Tennessee, at which time I first learned about the Abe Miller Group. I also visited the Christian Community(now disbanded) established by Elmo Stoll in Tennessee. I am quite certain you are knowledgeable about other groups, including the several groups of Swartzentruber Amish.I mention these as possible points of interest.

          Should you wish to continue our conversation, I would be happy to correspond with you by email, by telephone, or by messenger on FaceBook. My email address is: larkat1943@icloud.com.

          Sincerely,
          Larry Clarence Lewis,
          Ontario, Canada.

          1. Jeremiah

            Larry

            You can find my reply above. As you noted, we can’t continue replying to the last post in that string, so I posted my reply to the previous post. I would be happy to hear about your experience with the Swartzentrubers.

            1. Larry Clarence Lewis

              Paoli Amish and Swartzentruber Amish

              Dear Jeremiah,

              Thank you for straightening out our connection. I was able to access both of your comments. Once again, thank you very much. Now for a reply.

              Baptized and Unbaptized : Handshake and Holy Kiss :
              I have observed the practice of the handshake and the holy kiss several times, and I concluded that the difference was between the baptized and unbaptized, but it also could have been only the clergy exchanging the holy kiss.

              Paoli Men wear Vests :
              I like this practice. Do you know the meaning behind it? Is it for modesty, or is there another reason behind it?

              Swartzentruber Church Service :
              I was only ever able to attend one service, way back on the early 1990s, in the Chesley, Ontario settlement. They were very friendly. One thing really stands out in my memory. One of the Holy Scripture passages must have had this text : “That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow.” It was very moving to be in their midst while everyone bowed his knee. Fortunately, this practice was known to me and I was able to participate in unison. I have some German and was able to follow the singing in the Ausbund — the pace of the singing naturally was a big help.
              When I visited the Ethridge Swartzentrubers, I had an introduction by another Old Order gentleman to a particular family. Once again, this was the early 1990s. The second day I visited was Ascension Day. You probably know how they observe Ascension Day. Very interesting simple observance.

              There is much we can talk about, naturally not all of it at once.
              Lastly, perhaps you can fill me in on the distinctions between the three-way split among the Swartzentrubers in the 1990s/2000s. I know what caused the original split, but out of that there now seem to be some distinctions among the three groups. Specifically, I have picked up that the Mose Miller Group is the most conservative of the three groups. Have you learned what conservative characteristics these are in contrast to the other two groups?

              In closing, I have been enjoying this conversation very much. Thank you again for your kindness and generosity. I leave it to you to set the pace and its continuity.

              Sincerely,
              Larry Clarence Lewis
              Ontario, Canada

              1. Jeremiah

                Swartzentrubers

                Paoli Men wear Vests :
                I like this practice. Do you know the meaning behind it? Is it for modesty, or is there another reason behind it?

                I think it’s a dress symbol of conservatism. I don’t think it’s necessarily connected with modesty unless the Paoli ladies wear the cape regularly. I wasn’t there through the week so I can’t add anything here. But in previous generations people generally wore more layers of clothing.

                Swartzentruber Church Service :
                I was only ever able to attend one service, way back on the early 1990s, in the Chesley, Ontario settlement. They were very friendly. One thing really stands out in my memory. One of the Holy Scripture passages must have had this text : “That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow.” It was very moving to be in their midst while everyone bowed his knee. Fortunately, this practice was known to me and I was able to participate in unison. I have some German and was able to follow the singing in the Ausbund — the pace of the singing naturally was a big help.

                That’s great. I think all Amish have this practice.

                There is much we can talk about, naturally not all of it at once.
                Lastly, perhaps you can fill me in on the distinctions between the three-way split among the Swartzentrubers in the 1990s/2000s. I know what caused the original split, but out of that there now seem to be some distinctions among the three groups. Specifically, I have picked up that the Mose Miller Group is the most conservative of the three groups. Have you learned what conservative characteristics these are in contrast to the other two groups?

                I don’t have details here. In Johnson-Weiner’s book on the New York Amish, she notes that Swartzentruber people often have to ask which group the other comes from. There are certainly some minor lifestyle differences. I think the majority of the issue is interpersonal relationships and church function. From an outsiders perspective I think the Andy Weaver Swartzentrubers are the least friendly.

                1. Larry Clarence Lewis

                  Paoli Amish/Swartzentruber Amish Discussion Continued.

                  Dear Jeremiah,

                  Once again, thank you for your good and informative responses.

                  Paoli Amish Layers of Clothing :

                  Yes, I agree that the wearing of vests by the Paoli Amish men is one of following the tradition handed down when more layers of clothing were the norm. When one views early photographs of men at a threshing in these parts, the men are all wearing long-sleeved shirts, trousers, and wide-brimmed straw hats : no short-sleeved shirts, no short trousers, no caps, and, certainly, no muscle shirts. At root, I believe that modesty was the inherited norm behind the degree of covering and the layers.

                  Swartzentruber Sunday Services— the Meal :

                  Have you attended Swartzentruber Sunday Services? I fully expect you have. The meal after the single service I attended was as I have read, except for the common bowl of bean soup. When you have attended, did they serve bean soup? How about the Paoli Amish, do they serve bean soup as part of their tradition?

                  Abe Miller sub-group of the Swartzentrubers as distinct from the Abe Miller Group from the 1980s :

                  In one of your earliest postings you spoke of an Abe Miller sub-group among the Swartzentrubers, distinct from the Abe Miller Group which came into being 40 to 50 years ago. I do not know this sub-group. When did it come into being, and for what reasons? Are you familiar with this group?

                  Once again, thank you for our conversation.

                  Sincerely,
                  Larry Clarence Lewis,
                  London, Ontario, Canada.

                  1. Jeremiah

                    Swartzentruber Amish

                    “At root, I believe that modesty was the inherited norm behind the degree of covering and the layers.”

                    I think you’re right. And as the Arabs have experience with, covered skin is cooler and suffers less from UV rays.

                    “Have you attended Swartzentruber Sunday Services? I fully expect you have. The meal after the single service I attended was as I have read, except for the common bowl of bean soup. When you have attended, did they serve bean soup? How about the Paoli Amish, do they serve bean soup as part of their tradition?”

                    Yes they served the famous bean soup. I love it but the problem was the guy next to me who had tobacco under his lip. But he ended up suggesting that I eat the bean soup and when I pointed out that I don’t like tobacco mixed with it then he agreed to eat out of one side of the bowl and me from another!

                    “Abe Miller sub-group of the Swartzentrubers as distinct from the Abe Miller Group from the 1980s :

                    In one of your earliest postings you spoke of an Abe Miller sub-group among the Swartzentrubers, distinct from the Abe Miller Group which came into being 40 to 50 years ago. I do not know this sub-group. When did it come into being, and for what reasons? Are you familiar with this group?”

                    I’m just going off the top of my head here but I think they started when a Swartzentruber youngie vandalized the farm of a church leader and the church punished the wrong people but a few leaders weren’t willing to relent because they didn’t want to appear lax. The split moved to other areas and I think they’re the really difficult-to-talk-to experience I had in Nicktown, PA on Old Christmas many moons ago!

    11. Lowell

      more information

      This news cast indicates he converted to the Amish 7 years ago and that fellow Amish issued complaints to law enforcement
      https://www.wkrn.com/news/local-news/amish-man-facing-drug-charges-had-marijuana-greenhouse-more-than-a-dozen-guns/indicates