Find an Amish product or business

Amish Business MapSearching for an Amish business?  The Amish Business Directory lists Amish companies and product retailers across North America.  Find addresses and contact info for Amish stores, markets, construction firms, and other businesses and goods at the links below.  Listed by state.

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Outdoor Structures ~ Crafts & Household ~ Furniture & Woodworking ~ Food & Markets ~ Construction ~ Toys & Recreation ~ Horse-Related

Check back for new categories of Amish-made goods to be added regularly.


Amish Structures Directory

Outdoor Structures
Amish Sheds
Amish Gazebos
Amish Barns

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Amish Crafts

Crafts & Household Items
Amish Quilts
Amish Baskets
Amish Birdhouses/Feeders
Amish Wind Chimes
Amish Fabrics
Amish Variety Stores

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Amish Wood Businesses Directory

Furniture & Woodworking
Amish Furniture
Amish Tables
Amish Beds
Amish Cabinets

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Amish Restaurants Directory

Food & Markets
Amish Markets
Amish Restaurants
Amish Grocery Stores

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Amish Construction Companies

Construction
Amish Roofers
Amish Builders
Amish Cabins

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Amish Recreation Products

Toys & Recreation
Amish Wagons
Amish Scooters
Amish-Made Toys

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Horse Carriage

Horse-Related
Amish Harness Shops
Amish Carriage Shops


Finding Amish stores and products

Amish Product DirectoryFrom modest roadside stand selling canned goods to vast retail showrooms harboring acres of Amish-made household furniture, Amish products can be found in a wide variety of venues.  You may have encountered an Amish product while on vacation in an Amish community.  You may have purchased furniture, quilts or other Amish-made goods online.  You may be searching for businesses in a specific community, or the nearest provider of a certain good to your home.

As you travel in Amish communities, you’re sure to notice roadside signs pointing the way down long farm lanes to workshops, retail stores and bakeries often housed adjacent to the Amish home.  Others will refrain from visiting Amish settlements, instead searching for Amish business signs pointing the way to venues selling Amish products online.

Shops Amish Country

Shops in Amish Country

Geographically-ordered listings in the guides included here (organized by state) are meant to make locating a seller of Amish products fast and easy.  The businesses listed here are both Amish-owned (noted when known) and non-Amish dealers of Amish products.  Addresses, phone numbers, and websites, when relevant, are provided.

Some Amish companies may have a web presence thanks to cooperation with English partners, or may rely on an English-owned website to retail their goods. The non-Amish companies listed in these directories typically maintain close relationships with Amish manufacturers, allowing them to cooperate to produce goods in response to changing tastes.

Amish quiltmakers for example create quilts in both traditional styles, but also in more modern designs, as well as related products that have become popular among English customers, such as quillows or patchwork bags.  An Amish furniture craftsman can design a new line of furniture in response to feedback given directly to him by customers, or if he is a wholesaler, channeled via a non-Amish retailer with whom he works.

In this manner Amish companies not only craft products aligned with Amish tradition, but also adapt to satisfy demands of their often highly non-Amish clientele. Interestingly, even those businesses which may seem to be strictly Amish-oriented in fact do a fair share of work for non-Amish.  For example, an Amish buggy shop may also do some restoration of turn-of-the-century era cars (a time when the “horseless carriage” wasn’t so drastically different in design from today’s Amish buggy).  Harness shops may do work for English horse owners, and horse-drawn equipment makers produce implements both for Plain farmers and English hobby farming enthusiasts.

Amish Businesses across America

The landscape of Amish occupations looks markedly different than it did for Amish forefathers of the 18th and 19th centuries.  While agriculture remains a mainstay in many Amish communities, today thousands of Amish households provide a number of goods and services via home-based businesses.  Amish business is a relatively recent phenomenon with roots in the mid-20th century, developing a full head of steam through the 1990s and into the 21st century.

Amish Cottage Business

Cottage businesses such as this bookstore support a growing Amish population

Home enterprises have filled a gap which has arisen due to high land prices and large families pricing many Amish out of the market for traditional dairy farming.  New generations of Amish business owners who, unlike their predecessors, never grew up on a farm, are founding businesses and taking over family firms in what is becoming for some a generational family tradition of entrepreneurship.

An Amish business may be as unassuming as an Amish housewife crafting candles in spare moments between taking care of household and children, to large Amish mini-factories employing dozens of workers and dedicated marketing and sales teams.

Most Amish businesses lie somewhere in the middle, existing as a small-scale means of providing a living for a single household.  Amish businesses may be owned and operated by males, females, or both in husband-wife partnerships.  Most commonly Amish men steer enterprises which employ family or neighbors in a locally-oriented environment.

Hershbergers Amish Bakery

Hershberger’s of Holmes County, Ohio is one of many thriving Amish bakeries

Common among Amish companies are businesses in the woodworking, construction, and manufacturing sectors.  Market stands thrive in the Mid-Atlantic region, typically operated by Pennsylvania Amish in and around large metropolitan areas of Baltimore, Philadelphia, New Jersey and beyond.  Crafts remain a strong sector for Amish females, with Amish women doing skilled craft work such as clothes making or quilting in their spare time and in some cases operating full-fledged full-time companies.

Some Amish businesspeople operate in more obscure fields as well.  Taxidermists, house movers, electricians (yes, electricians), accountants, health store owners, bookbinders, beekeepers and casket makers are all among the less-common enterprises occasionally seen on the Amish landscape.  Though they restrict formal education, Amish have shown a knack for entrepreneurship often coming up with creative ideas for business ventures.

When you buy Amish-made products and services, you are helping to support Amish families who have adapted to a new entrepreneurial tradition likely to persist for generations to come.  Likewise, many Amish-made products will last for generations themselves, offering value for decades to come.

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Photo credits: US Map: NinJA999/flickr; Amish worker figurine: Curious Expeditions/flickr; Quilt: maryfrancesmain/flickr; Amish woodworker: taratara69/flickr; Amish roof construction: wcn247/flickr; Amish scooter: Claude Robillard/flickr; Steev Hise/flickr


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