“I did not tell them I was leaving…I left them a note, and left.”

Miriam Lambright says that “looking outside, I was like – there’s more there.” Leaving her community meant “freedom.”

Miriam left the Amish seven years ago, at age 22. Her story is briefly told in a new video from Milwaukee station WTMJ.

We don’t get a ton of background in the 2-minute clip, besides her sense of dissatisfaction with an Amish life.

She did have her first photo taken when she was 14, when someone had snuck a camera into the community.

Clearly Miriam did not have Amish life in her DNA.

Or maybe that’s incorrect.

Maybe in different family or community or other circumstances, she would have found contentment and stayed. We don’t know.

That is actually an unexplained question in some of these stories in which people leave the Amish – for instance the recent case of John Shrock.

Troubles at home make leaving the community that much more attractive.

Another example is Saloma Furlong, who has documented her traumatic home life, and journey out of the Amish, in two books.

While it’s unclear what her family life was like, Miriam says “her path was set for her at birth”, in the words of the reporter. The typical Amish housewife/family trajectory was not for her.

Miriam seems like a very cheerful person, and content with her baking business: “it’s a very good feeling when you see people come in and buy your goods that you made…I just love watching people enjoy good food.”

Some people leave the Amish because their ambitions don’t fit with an Amish life (ie, desire for higher education, incompatible careers, etc.).

Baking is certainly a passion that Miriam could have pursued within the Amish. But she clearly wanted more.

It looks like she found the right place for her.

One last, puzzling thing about this video that caught my eye, or rather, ear.

Is it just me, or do I hear a New York accent in her voice?

I don’t know how folks in Waupaca County speak, but for the most part it doesn’t sound “typical Wisconsin” – or “Amish” for that matter – to me.

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