Amish_scooter_4

‘Sylvan’, one of my Amish friends in Lancaster County, runs a scooter workshop in addition to milking cows.

In Lancaster County and related settlements, you rarely see bicycles–in Lancaster, for instance, there are only a few church districts I’m aware of that seem to allow them.

Amish_scooters_lancaster

I’ve also seen scooters in use among the Amish of Allen County, Indiana, and I’d imagine they’d be found in other areas that adhere to a somewhat stricter Ordnung.

Pink_amish_scooter

Sylvan says that his pink line has never really taken off.  Come to think of it, I don’t think I’ve ever seen a pink one on the road.  Green, red, and blue are the most popular colors.

Midwestern Amish in contrast to their Lancaster counterparts tend to be a lot more open to using bikes–the Amish around Arthur, Illinois and those in Lagrange/Elkhart counties come to mind right away.  The men there often use them to ride to jobs in the local garage door and RV plants.

I’m also acquainted with an Amishman in northern Indiana who manufactures the recumbent bike–the one that looks like a cross between a bicycle and a recliner.  This particular ride is a hit in a number of the more progressive settlements.  Sort of a luxury comfort ride on the spectrum of two-wheeled non-motorized transport.

Buy an Amish-made Scooter

If you’re looking to get an Amish-made scooter for yourself, or as a gift for a child or adult friend, you don’t have to go all the way to Lancaster County.

Lancaster-style Amish-made scooters are available online.

They’re made by the well-known Amish business Groffdale Machine, for sale via Amazon.

Here you can check out the Amish-made child’s scooter (16″ wheel model), and the larger 24″ wheel adult scooter.

These are advertised as the same type that Amish use in Lancaster County.

The adult models come in dark green, maroon, navy blue, and black, while the children’s scooters come in a wider array of colors including the aforementioned pink, as well as plum and hunter green.

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