27 responses to Should we really beware the Amish-made label?
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    Linda
    Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 1st, 2012 at 07:06)

    Erik, regarding Unker’s Medicated Salve or Skinner’s Vaporizing Salve, I question the use of the word “homeopathic.” It is somewhat a home remedy.

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    Naomi
    Comment on Quaker labels (August 1st, 2012 at 07:12)

    Quaker labels

    The same issue was relevant for Quakers over a century ago. Quakers were known for their honesty in business dealings, thus Quaker Oats and Quaker State Oil, neither of which had anything to do with Quakerism (that I know of). Many years later, Quakers have fallen into relative obscurity (in part perhaps a result of abandoning plain dress), but the labels have stuck around.

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      Matt from CT
      Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 1st, 2012 at 14:54)

      Quaker Oats I believe was a direct effort to capitalize on the Quaker image.

      Quaker State Oil, however, I think more comes from the nickname of Pennsylvania as the “Quaker State” and earlier “Quaker Province” since William Penn was a Quaker, and ensured the charter included a liberty of conscious (religion) clause. The name came into being when a number of oil companies in Oil City, PA merged around 1900.

      I could be wrong, but at least the business folk back then had plausible deniability about why they chose the name 😉

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    Forest
    Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 1st, 2012 at 08:48)

    Best thing to do is go straight to the horse’s mouth. Buy it directly from an Amish maker. You eliminate the middleman, and by doing so it saves you money and helps the producer. It’s a little more trouble, but probably worth it in the long run. Do a Ebay search for “Amish Quilt”; you’ll find about a bazillion hits, of which at best half are actually Amish made. The rest are Amish inspired” or “Almost Amish” or “Amish style” or somesuch verbage intended into misleading the unwary.

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      Lattice
      Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 1st, 2012 at 10:40)

      I agree, Forest. I imagine that the majority of American consumers have a healthy skepticism when they make their purchases. We’re all accustomed to “knock offs” and realize that we take a risk when we buy anything that makes a claim of one sort or another. Sure, there will always be those who end up feeling like they were misled or taken advantage of, but I believe that those people either “never learn,” or learn a valuable lifelong lesson: consumer beware.

      It probably benefits the Amish. It publicizes that Amish products are so good, every manufacturer wishes they could do it “their way.” Savvy consumers will drive out to Amish County to purchase the “real deal.”

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        Lattice
        Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 1st, 2012 at 10:44)

        Amish “COUNTRY.” …I’ve been making lots of typos lately. Wish I knew how to edit.

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          Kentucky Lady 717
          Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 1st, 2012 at 19:25)

          I keep asking Erik to give us an EDIT BUTTON…..don’t know what he’s waiting on…..hey Erik, did you hear this ???? :)

          GIVE US AN EDIT BUTTON PLEASE :)

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            Linda
            Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 1st, 2012 at 19:48)

            Kentucky Lady 717, if you have time, you could compose a comment in your email, then spell-check it, then copy and paste it to leave a reply at Amish America. But that wouldn’t help everything because “county” and “country” are both spelled correctly.

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    Tammy
    Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 1st, 2012 at 09:46)

    I agree with Forest…I recently did an “Amish” search on Ebay and saw a very similar quilt to one I own made by a Not Amish lady.

    I did end up ordering my husband a work belt that said Amish made and came from Sugar Creek Ohio. Was it truly Amish made? We don’t know but judging from the looks of it it is very high quality. I just hope it lasts him longer than the Walmart {Dickies} kind that wore out within weeks. Dickies company said not their problem…which figures…ha!

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    Tom Geist
    Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 1st, 2012 at 11:14)

    ” If a guy with a beard, suspenders and last name Yoder takes your money in a dimly lit shop with a bunch of barefoot kiddos running around, you’re probably on the right track.”

    Love it!

    Even in some of the Amish stores, I have been to, they sell non Amish made items. Like the wood block train whistle that I would assume the Amish could easily make, but the lable listed it’s origin as China.

    Maybe I am just being dumb about buying things that are made by the Amish, as many English made items can hold up just as well. I just like the idea that I have something made by the Amish.

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    Tammy N
    Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 1st, 2012 at 12:35)

    Wondering why my comment did not make the cut?

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    Alice Mary
    Comment on What's in a name? (August 1st, 2012 at 15:14)

    What's in a name?

    I find it both interesting and frustrating that some people use “Amish” to sell their (non-Amish-made) goods, knowing that the name “sells” just about anything it’s attached to.

    However, from all I’ve read & learned about the Amish, they themselves would not bring a lawsuit against anyone doing just that (non-Amish benefitting from the “Amish” name).

    Do YOU (Erik or anyone else) know if Amish have ever done such a thing? Has anyone (in the “English” community) sued the “non-Amish” for misrepresenting themselves or their goods as being Amish/Amish-made when that’s not true?

    I sure wish I had more time to read more here. (Working for a living can make one ignorant!)

    Alice Mary

    • Great question Alice Mary, sorry I’m just catching up with everything now (visited the NC beach and had a long weekend). I’ve never heard of any lawsuit of the sort and wouldn’t expect too…something like this coming from Amish would be highly frowned upon to say the least.

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    Richard from Amish Stories
    Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 1st, 2012 at 17:59)

    I try and buy the best quality items regardless if its Amish made or not to be honest, and I truly think that most anything that’s American made is usually superior to anything made in Asia. They said years ago that we (America) was going to get away from actually making anything here anymore, that we didn’t need to have a manufacturing base and that we were going towards being strictly a services orientated country. Who ever came up with that one “man are they so very wrong” in my book. Richard from www.Amishstories.net

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      Kentucky Lady 717
      Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 1st, 2012 at 19:32)

      You are so right Richard….that is what’s wrong with this country right now…..everyone buys everything from china, mexico, and all the other countries who make this crap and sells it to us…..when I shop, I always look to see where it is made and or produced and if it is from one of these countries, I put it back on the shelf…..we need to buy AMERICAN and keep the jobs here…..

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    Tom in KY
    Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 1st, 2012 at 18:37)

    I buy and sell Amish products. I buy from the Amish that I live by and they know my purchases are for resale, I buy in bulk, for example 10-20 quilts at a time or several pieces of furniture in order to receive better pricing. I actually receive the same rates as a larger retailer because I have taken the time to get to know the Amish I purchase from. All products I sell are 100 percent Amish but I do not include the term Amish in the name of my business or any other term that relates to the Amish. I do however advertise 100 percent Amish made products, because they are made by the Amish. The Amish I work with enjoy the arraignments and I benefit also. I deal with the world and they do not have to have constant interaction with the outside world.

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      Tom in KY
      Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 1st, 2012 at 18:57)

      Self correction, It should be arrangement not arraignments

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        Kentucky Lady 717
        Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 1st, 2012 at 19:28)

        Tom, the edit button would have come in handy here too eh :) Let’s keep asking Erik to give us an EDIT BUTTON…..:) and he just might……

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          Valerie
          Comment on I don't mind the errors (August 2nd, 2012 at 06:26)

          I don't mind the errors

          Take my errors as sign of my own imperfection, I don’t mind, and hopefully will make you giggle in realizing we’re all human and make mistakes. Maybe my booboos make you feel better about your booboos :)
          (Did i really just say that on a public forum?)

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    Valerie
    Comment on Amish labels on wine (August 2nd, 2012 at 06:22)

    Amish labels on wine

    In Holmes County OH there are some wineries. And one of them was approached by an Amish Bishop, from what I heard, to change their sign on the road as it gave the impression that this was an Amish winery. So now the sign reads “Amish Country Wines”. But they do like to put horse & buggy on some of their labels-(admittedly, I bought some!) The Amish do make their own wine for communion and possibly do not abstain in addition to communion, I can’t say for sure what their ordinance is on the matter-but one thing-they did not want the public believing this winery was Amish!

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    sarah
    Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 2nd, 2012 at 20:25)

    I’ve always found the “amish” potato salad that is sold at walmart to be amusing…

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    Barb
    Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 3rd, 2012 at 09:41)

    Sarah – In my area (southeastern PA), Amish potato salad is a type and flavoring of potato salad, just as German Potato Salad is a distinctive type and flavoring. Most of our grocery stores have several “versions” of potato salad — plain, German, Amish,red potato, etc. And the Amish potato salad recipes are very similar from store to store. I don’t think of it as “using the Amish name to sell”, but rather as a way to identify the type and flavor you are purchasing (and original recipe source).

    Just how I’ve always viewed it.

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    Jessica G.
    Comment on Should we really beware the Amish-made label? (August 27th, 2012 at 00:41)

    I have friends at my conservative Mennonite church (here in Alberta, hundreds of miles from any Amish) who own a store called Classic Furnishings, which sells the “Simply Amish” brand of furniture. They tell me that they often get customers who come in and want to know if they are the “real thing.” The furniture that they sell is Amish-made, but they know the implications of using the name as a selling feature and they don’t seem to mind.

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    David Koch
    Comment on Amish made in China (December 6th, 2012 at 11:54)

    Amish made in China

    I took my youngest son with me to an Amish owned and operated store last year for Christmas. He wanted to buy his mom an Amish wooden rolling pin to do her baking with. When she opened it on Christmas she found a made in China tag. We were disgusted. The reason we went to Amish Country was to buy Made in USA by Amish goods. I never thought about checking for a tag. If you cannot trust the Amish … who can you trust. That is a lesson my son and I learned last year. I would expect an Amish clock, or similar item, to have components made elsewhere, but not wooden items. Very sad and disappointing.

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