5 responses to Debunking some Speech Myths
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    Laura Young
    Comment on Debunking some Speech Myths (April 2nd, 2007 at 13:20)

    Interesting blog! :)

    The “thee” and “thy” confusion is older than the Weird Al song, however; it probably originated several centuries ago when new Amish communities were established near plain-dressing, plain-speaking Quaker communities in Pennsylvania.

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    Comment on Debunking some Speech Myths (April 2nd, 2007 at 16:59)

    That’s interesting Laura, I’d never heard that before.

    Thanks for reading! (:

    Erik

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    itazurakko
    Comment on Debunking some Speech Myths (June 21st, 2007 at 17:37)

    I’ve just found your blog recently, and I am enjoying it. I realize I have some of the books you show in the sidebar.

    I can say though, being from Illinois, that the “anymore” speech pattern seems to happen all over the state, including in Chicago. I say it myself, which amuses my friends from elsewhere!

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    Comment on Debunking some Speech Myths (June 24th, 2007 at 19:02)

    Hi itazurakko, glad you like it–I have also heard ‘anymore’ from non-Amish as well, it just seemed to show up a bit more

    whenever I sell books among the Amish I find myself unintentionally starting to mimic their English speech patterns just a tad, at least the way they pronounce a bit. it’s funny when I catch myself. I guess it’s the same when I’m in the South, or in Europe–accent gets more ‘southern’ or ‘flat’ accordingly.

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    Comment on Debunking some Speech Myths (March 18th, 2008 at 16:37)

    They are speaking English – rather than American English 😀

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