20 responses to David Arment: How Bob Found His Way Home
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    Comment on Cute Story... (January 8th, 2015 at 07:56)

    Cute Story...

    Cute story about Bob the WonderPony…, although it makes me wonder why my photo trips never end up so interesting. 😉

    As to your hit-n-run questions, some possible answers that come to mind:

    Q: How did the buggy “cut-off” the car in such a way as to make a collision inevitable?
    A: Myself, I would think that (from the English driver’s perspective) it *more* likely to happen with a buggy than a fellow automobile. From the car driver’s frame of ref., the buggy coming into her lane is (relatively) slow motion. Where another auto could turn in front of her and be up to speed and out of the way, the much slower buggy covers that ground in a much longer period of time. A normally safe distance between turner and turned-in-front-of is closed in faster than anticipated time, giving the auto driver a greater sense of being cut-off. And not anticipating that time difference, a collision would seem inevitable.

    Q: If the buggy indeed fled the scene, why couldn’t/didn’t the car driver pursue and catch it?
    A: Wouldn’t that make the auto driver guilty of leaving the scene of an accident — which I have been taught (barring threat to life or limb) one should never do before the police show up?

    Q: At that time of day in Yoder’s parking lot, how were there (1) no witnesses to support the driver’s version of events, and/or (2) to pursue the buggy?
    A: (1) or to even recognize the horse and buggy — good question; (2) Haha…, this conjures up an image of Dudes of Hazzard ‘hot pursuit’ — horse-and-buggy style! 😉

    Q: If the metal bodied car sustained a degree of damage that prevented it being driven, how much more damage would’ve been sustained by the wood and fiberglass buggy?
    A: I don’t remember the details of the original post on this accident, but the summary above does not mention the nature or degree of damage to the auto. And I’m not so sure that “metal bodied” is all that accurate any more, what with plastic crush bumpers and under-carriage guards. Is it possible that being clipped (or fearing that she would be) the driver turned into another object, sideswiped a guardrail, or simply was not emotionally able to drive after the (relatively minor) ding (broken plastic crush bumper, scratched/dented light metal body, etc.) from contact with the buggy? Could any of this have even deployed the air bags?

    Or, of course, the gal could just be lying through her teeth.

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      Comment on Whodunit? (January 8th, 2015 at 11:47)

      Whodunit?

      Don all interesting suggestions. It sounds like a parody story to read that an Amish buggy was the culprit in a hit-and-run.

      But your suggestions are reasonable. Even with something which sounds as minor as a parking lot accident, she may have been in a state of shock. Or if not from the accident, I think seeing the buggy “peel out” would cause my jaw to drop, were I in her shoes.

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    Slightly-handled-Order-man
    Comment on David Arment: How Bob Found His Way Home (January 8th, 2015 at 11:13)

    I’m surprised the animal didn’t find its way back on its own to the original Amish owners.

    My father told me a tale about a horse that made its way back to its owners old farm (after either collectively being moved or being sold, I forget) wandering a long distance only to be found by the new owners of the horse’s old home. I know it amazed my Dad, staying in his memory over 70 years.

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    Comment on I thoroughly enjoyed this story.... (January 8th, 2015 at 11:45)

    I thoroughly enjoyed this story....

    Bob indeed was had quite an adventure. Maybe there will be an update and we will learn how an Amish pony adjusts to an English life! Thanks so much for posting this!

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    Mark – Holmes Co.
    Comment on David Arment: How Bob Found His Way Home (January 8th, 2015 at 11:53)

    Was the pony shunned?

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    Mark – Holmes Co.
    Comment on David Arment: How Bob Found His Way Home (January 8th, 2015 at 12:29)

    Good answer, Forest. 🙂 We both overlooked the obvious, though — Bob was clearly on his “Rumspringa.”

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      Comment on David Arment: How Bob Found His Way Home (January 8th, 2015 at 13:00)

      Of course, no doubt you are correct. But how long does Rumspringa typically last for a pony colt?

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        Mark – Holmes Co.
        Comment on David Arment: How Bob Found His Way Home (January 8th, 2015 at 13:08)

        Well, according to popular fiction, and of course we would not think to question that, Bob likely started his Rumspringa year at 16 and has the rest of the year to decide if he wants to be an Amish pony or not. He does look rather young to be running around, though… Maybe it varies from herd to herd?

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          Jonathan Edwards
          Comment on Keeping this on the topic of identity... (January 9th, 2015 at 06:02)

          Keeping this on the topic of identity...

          Holmes County Mark,

          While we’re discussing the identity/names/labels…are you by any chance from the New New Order/New Order Christian Fellowship/Aden Leut?

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            Mark – Holmes Co.
            Comment on David Arment: How Bob Found His Way Home (January 9th, 2015 at 08:59)

            None of the above. I’m Old Order. Some would call us “Soud Leut.”

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            Mark – Holmes Co.
            Comment on David Arment: How Bob Found His Way Home (January 9th, 2015 at 09:01)

            Reread question: Thought it was “New Order” then Christian Fellowship/ Aden Leut. The three labels you used all apply to the same group. You missed one name, though “New and Improved New Order.” 🙂

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        Comment on Isn't the answer obvious....? (January 8th, 2015 at 15:23)

        Isn't the answer obvious....?

        “But how long does Rumspringa typically last for a pony colt?”

        It’s only a little bit!

        And clearly his owner thought that Bob had spent too much time on Rumspringa ’cause when Bob returned he told him, “It pasture time.” 😉

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    Alice Mary
    Comment on Wondering... (January 8th, 2015 at 12:47)

    Wondering...

    …what was Bob’s Amish name?

    Alice Mary

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      Comment on David Arment: How Bob Found His Way Home (January 8th, 2015 at 12:55)

      “Bob” is the last name I would come up with for a pony colt. Nothing against the Bobs out there, but “Bob” is the name of my uncle or my accountant, not a cute little animal like this guy. But I love it. It’s a mismatch that fits. Good naming job, little two-year-old man.

      I suspect what Bob’s Amish name was shall remain a mystery, unless David is able to do some further investigative reporting. In the meantime, any guesses? 🙂

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    Carolyn B
    Comment on David Arment: How Bob Found His Way Home (January 8th, 2015 at 14:48)

    Erik, thanks for having David contribute this story on Bob. Delightful! I vote for any follow-up stories too. 🙂

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    Comment on David Arment: How Bob Found His Way Home (January 8th, 2015 at 19:49)

    LOL Great story and great comments.. Thanks Guys.. I needed these laughs today! 😀

    The hit & run horse could have been a runaway… If it was already bolting before it “hit” the car that would very easily explain why a horse & buggy would cut someone off..
    A runaway horse is insane.. I’ve been on a few in my life.. trust me.. I know what I speak of. 😉 That would also explain why the horse didnt stop… perhaps they werent in control of the beast..

    As to damage or no one seeing it… who knows.. You know the Amish like to keep to themselves… so if something like this DID happen.. and a few people knew of it.. would they offer the information to the law?

    And maybe it would depend on who it was, no matter if they were Amish or not.. I know there are many people out there who talking to the law is the last thing they’d be doing.. believing there is nothing in it for them.. Not everyone (like your readers) are awesome, caring individuals..

    As for damage done.. who knows.. I like the plastic car theory… Are the buggies on a metal frame at all? Stranger things have happened.. I never say never.. 😀

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      Mark – Holmes Co.
      Comment on David Arment: How Bob Found His Way Home (January 9th, 2015 at 09:03)

      Very true about a runaway horse! I think the whole story sounds fishy, though… Somehow it just doesn’t sound believable.

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        Forest in North Carolina
        Comment on David Arment: How Bob Found His Way Home (January 9th, 2015 at 10:03)

        Similar to the report I heard one time back home about a fellow who hit a bulldozer that “darted out in front of him”

        My grandfather was almost killed with a runaway team when he was a young man, so I know it can be dangerous…. I have to agree with Mark, tho’, it does sound a bit shaky.

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