33 responses to Amish in Virginia
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    Comment on Amish in Virginia (June 10th, 2011 at 13:46)

    Even though I’ve been through the state of Virginia many times , I’ve never stopped at its Amish settlement. But i would maybe say land prices Erik as maybe one reason why the Amish population has not grown like in most other settlements in other states. Being so close to heavily populated Washington D.C might be part of the reason why the land cost would be on the high side, and the Amish I’m sure are very sensitive to that fact. Richard from the Amish settlement of Lebanon,Pa.

    Amish in Virginia

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    Comment on Amish in Virginia (June 10th, 2011 at 18:02)

    Richard I think you are right, well definitely in northern VA. But there is also a lot of Appalachian VA, not too unlike what Amish have settled in Kentucky. There could be other issues like building codes or who knows what. I haven’t really looked into it much but thought I’d throw it out on a Friday afternoon :)

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    Robin Miller
    Comment on Amish in Princess Anne County (June 10th, 2011 at 18:16)

    Amish in Princess Anne County

    I live in Virginia Beach, have for the most part since 1978. Though there are no Amish in our area, we do have several Mennonite communities in both Virginia Beach and Chesapeake. Both the Bergey and Yoder families ran dairy farms and processing plants up until about 5 years ago, offering home delivery, fresh ice cream and dairy stores. I live in the Kempsville section of the city, once a rural farming community and home to these Mennonite families. The Bergey family has reopened their store in the “country” in Chesapeake, making small batch ice cream, delicious baked goods and sandwiches. They also offer bottled milk, though not processed by them as well as offering jams, potato chips, flours and other items “imported” from Pennsylvania and Ohio.

    Amish in Princess Anne County

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    Comment on Pearisburg/White Gate (June 10th, 2011 at 19:36)

    Pearisburg/White Gate

    Erik,

    I just moved to VA from NC and was happy to find an Amish community nearby in the Appalachian foothills of Giles County right on the border of Bland County. The community is called White Gate. They dress and seem to conform as if they are Old Order, but I’m not sure that is the case. I talked to a girl in a store that a Kauffman family runs there and she said they came from Kentucky around 1991. They have buggies and the store is run on “Amish electricity.”

    Pearisburg/White Gate

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    Lisa
    Comment on Amish in Virginia (June 10th, 2011 at 19:37)

    I live in the twin cities Bristol TN and VA. On the Bristol, VA side there is an Amish store just off Lee Highway. I’ve never been but am told it is run by Amish and is not “in name only”. Nearby at at Walmart, I encountered what I thought was an Amish lady, but I wasn’t 100% positive because her dress was pink and I wouldn’t expect pink on an adult; maybe I’m wrong on that or maybe this lady was actually Mennonite, but I am unaware of Mennonites in this are. Seems we have at least one Amish family in Bristol, VA. I have never heard of a settlement here. Is it unusual for one or two families to settle away from other Amish?

    Amish in Virginia

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      Lauren
      Comment on Amish in Virginia (October 4th, 2012 at 17:26)

      Lisa:
      I also live in Bristol the amish store is amazing they have really good sandwiches!! But I didn’t know they were owned by amish people that’s really cool! I think an “amish” family lives in my neighborhood I live right on the Tn/Va line I’m not for sure though.. I do know they wear dresses and skirts all the time. I guess that could be amish lol!

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        Naomi WIlson
        Comment on Amish in Virginia (August 27th, 2013 at 08:59)

        They may be Beachy Amish Mennonite. I believe there is a congregation in that area. Why don’t you ask your neighbors? They would probably be more than happy to share information about their faith if you are interested!

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      Daphne Huffman
      Comment on Woman in pink dress (August 26th, 2013 at 17:13)

      Woman in pink dress

      Lisa from Bristol, in general, the Amish women I see from the Giles County VA area wear darker colors, and as Erik said, never print. I also agree that they use safety pins rather than buttons. My understanding for this is that they consider buttons to be an adornment. The woman in a pink dress that you saw may have been German Baptist. The women of that faith who I see in the Roanoke area were pretty print dresses in all colors.

      Woman in pink dress

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    Karen
    Comment on Amish in Virginia (June 10th, 2011 at 21:32)

    Why is there no Amish out West, say, in California?

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    Donna Godfrey
    Comment on Here is a answer. (June 10th, 2011 at 21:44)

    Here is a answer.

    http://www.gameo.org/encyclopedia/encyclopedia/contents/fauquier_county_virginia_old_order_amish

    Fauquier County, Virginia, Old Order Amish Settlement

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    Donna Godfrey
    Comment on Here is another community in Va (June 10th, 2011 at 21:49)

    Here is another community in Va

    http://www.southsidecentral.com/wordpress/2009/07/26/an-inside-look-at-halifax-countys-amish-community-part-1/

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    Esther
    Comment on Amish in Virginia (June 11th, 2011 at 00:12)

    Amish in Virginia

    We lived in Fauquier County, Virginia for two years, 1971 – 1973, and attended the Amish church. The church became extinct soon after we left with most of the other families moving out. Those that remained attended the Beachy church which is still there.

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      Mary Ellen
      Comment on "Amish" Churches (September 21st, 2011 at 10:24)

      "Amish" Churches

      I’m from Ohio, where we have the largest Amish settlement in the world. The Amish have Church services in private homes, every other week. Unlike most people, they do not have regular church buildings. Amish women wear any color they choose, as long as it’s a plain color, not a print. When out shopping, the females ALWAYS wear a large black bonnet over their smaller “kapp”, which is a small white bonnet. Here are some easy ways to tell if a woman is “real” Amish. The hair directly around the face is twisted and then pulled to the back and worked into the bun under the kapp. Their clothing does not use zippers or buttons, only pins. And then there is the language they speak, which is their own dialect and similar to High German. They do NOT speak “Pennsylvania Dutch”. That term is not correct, as there is no such thing. Years ago, I had several very good friends who were Old Order Amish and they were more than happy to answer all my silly questions!

      "Amish" Churches

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    Forest
    Comment on Amish in Virginia (June 11th, 2011 at 11:17)

    Actually, land prices in Southside Virginia can be pretty reasonable, hence the recent move of AMish from Delaware to Halifax Co., Va. The Shenandoah Valley also has a large horse and buggy Mennonite settlement, which most visitors would take to be Amish if they didn’t know better. It’s near Dayton.

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    marijane
    Comment on looking for amish (June 11th, 2011 at 11:53)

    looking for amish

    Does anyone know of any Amish in NY? I have visited those in Ohio and PA

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    marijane
    Comment on Amish in Virginia (June 11th, 2011 at 11:54)

    very good information on this site would like any info on Amish in NY

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    Comment on NY Amish (June 11th, 2011 at 11:58)

    NY Amish

    Hi Marijane, thank you. For Amish in New York, try this: http://amishamerica.com/new-york-amish/

    Lot of info on NY Amish on that one.

    And if you’re interested in others here is the full guide to Amish in all states: http://amishamerica.com/amish-state-guide/

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    Comment on Amish in California (June 11th, 2011 at 12:02)

    Amish in California

    Karen to my knowledge there’s only been one attempt made to settle in California. It’s a good question, CA after all is a heavily agricultural state, though as I understand it a lot is large-scale production? Historically speaking distance I’m sure discouraged CA settlement; nowadays I have to think things like land prices and levels of taxation in California would discourage Amish from thinking of that kind of a move.

    Here’s the history of the one CA Amish settlement if you’re interested:

    http://amishamerica.com/settlements_tha/

    Amish in California

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    Donna Godfrey
    Comment on States may not welcome Amish (June 11th, 2011 at 12:47)

    States may not welcome Amish

    Some states simply do not welcome their buggies on the roads.
    I was raised Mennonite with relatives that are Amish. If you want some answers to questions you may want to read the books by Donald Kraybill.Here is his site.
    http://www2.etown.edu/amishstudies/

    I will say we are cousins and he is very trusted by the Amish Bishops and he does write truth.
    Donna G

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    Comment on Pearisburg/Giles County VA Amish (June 11th, 2011 at 13:21)

    Pearisburg/Giles County VA Amish

    @Adrian the Pearisburg group is apparently a little different than most Amish from what I’ve heard. I’m not sure exactly what their affiliation is but I think there are some New Order-ish tendencies and apparently they are accomodating of visitors and outsiders. Maybe others on here know more about this group.

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      Comment on Amish Moving from Whitegate Community (December 22nd, 2011 at 16:06)

      Amish Moving from Whitegate Community

      My wife and I visited the Whitegate community in Giles County, VA,recently and discovered that meny families were leaving for other locations (notably Missourin and Lee County, VA).

      Also, the Amish merchantile store is relocating.

      Is this community completely dispersing to other locations?

      Thank you and we enjoy your information.

      Dave T.

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    Comment on Bristol VA plain people (June 11th, 2011 at 13:27)

    Bristol VA plain people

    Lisa sounds like that may have been a Mennonite or Beachy Amish person, to be honest I am not as up to speed on Mennonite communities’ locations but am not aware of any Amish in that area. There is however apparently a community in Lee County VA, or at least there was one as of a couple of years ago. It looks like this would be about an hour’s drive from Bristol. So perhaps there is someone from that group that travels to run the store?

    Sometimes Amish will set up with just one or two families but it is in the hopes of attracting more or knowing that more are planning to arrive.

    One of the keys to surviving as a settlement is attracting enough families and another is to have a permanent resident minister. Many Amish communities haven’t made it because they have failed to do one or the other (in addition to other reasons).

    Bristol VA plain people

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      Jim
      Comment on Mennoites in Lee County, VA (July 17th, 2013 at 23:55)

      Mennoites in Lee County, VA

      There is a community of Mennonites in Lee County, VA as of 7/17/13. They are a congregation full of vitality and life. Wonderful, hospitable people. I have been attending their church at Rose Hill, Va., and have been welcomed with open arms. They are very patient with me and try to answer all my questions! I feel welcome there and am always invited back.

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        Forest
        Comment on Amish in Virginia (July 18th, 2013 at 07:11)

        Yes, very nice folks. Some of them have visited us in Yanceyville several times, and I hope we can return the visit fairly soon. It’s about a 5.5/6 hour drive from us here, or maybe less if you don’t drive like I do…

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    Comment on Fauquier County VA (June 11th, 2011 at 13:36)

    Fauquier County VA

    Donna thanks for the links and especially the Halifax Co Amish link, I had not seen that one. And the Fauquier Co link as well, I remembered reading a bit about this one (I mentioned the first late 1800s Fauquier County settlement at the state guide link).

    Also, Esther it was very interesting to hear from you as someone who was a part of this community. And one more thing, Donna you are lucky to have DK for a cousin! Agree with what you said. On that note here’s a recommended resources list but I need to add to it: http://amishamerica.com/recommended-amish-resources/

    Fauquier County VA

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    Comment on Amish in Virginia (June 11th, 2011 at 13:39)

    I would say the same thing would apply to California as Virginia with its high land prices, especially California with its very high taxes and outrageous cost of living. So i think the Amish are looking for good buys in land just like the rest of us are, and i can see why place like Montana and Missouri are growing to name just a few. For Lebanon county for example, prices are generally a little lower than in connecting county Lancaster, and as a whole so is the taxes. I think it mostly always comes down to how much value can someone get with the land, but i understand some other factors are in play like location and soil quality. I’m not sure if the Amish population in Lancaster county is growing because of new Amish residents, or the fact that its population that already live in the county is expanding. I would guess its the later. Richard from the Amish settlement of Lebanon county.

    Amish in Virginia

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    Eli
    Comment on Amish in Virginia (June 11th, 2011 at 17:13)

    So I have come across the concept of a group of Amish moving hundreds of miles to form a new community. I would love to hear about how they pull off the logistics of something like this without driving or the Internet. I would imagine they could hire a moving company and ride busses. Does a “scout” go touring around the country on a bus searching for locations?

    When the thought first entered my head I had a vision of a big horse drawn moving wagon :)

    Amish in Virginia

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    Donna Godfrey
    Comment on Here is an article on why they move (June 11th, 2011 at 18:08)

    Here is an article on why they move

    http://www.cleveland.com/nation/index.ssf/2010/07/amish_expand_westward_scout_ou.html

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    Comment on How do Amish find new places to live? (June 13th, 2011 at 13:14)

    How do Amish find new places to live?

    Hi Eli, sorry I’m a little slow responding, I’ve been a bit under the weather. There is definitely scouting done and that has been the way of things even back in the “old days”. Some of that was encouraged and even financed by land agents, railroads and development companies. Some Amish took homesteading opportunities on the frontiers made available through the Homestead Act.

    Not much of that any more, but nowadays an Amish scout or group of Amish may and will often visit on their own, sometimes by hired vehicle, or occasionally by public transport with the more conservative groups. But when they do move, yes they do need to hire transport and moving companies to get essential things from point A to B.

    Also, even though they typically don’t use a lot of internet, they can still benefit from the knowledge online. Some will be able to access the data that is available online through non-Amish friends, co-workers, and other contacts.

    Of course there is also the Budget and other Plain publications. These, and in particular the Budget have a long history of communicating news from new settlements and encouraging/discouraging others to join. It really is in some ways like the Plain paper internet.

    How do Amish find new places to live?

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    Rosa
    Comment on Pearisburg, VA / White Gate Community (June 14th, 2011 at 13:05)

    Pearisburg, VA / White Gate Community

    @ Adrian:

    Would love to hear more about this community. I was unaware there was an Amish Community [somewhat] close to me.

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    Julie Howson-Reinhart
    Comment on Amish in Giles County (March 9th, 2012 at 10:54)

    Amish in Giles County

    I realize this comment is probably several months too late for this thread! However I live not too far from Giles Co. (Whitegate) and we took a day trip up there in Autumn 2011 and had a good day there. There was an outdoor auction and bake sale. Proceeds from the bake sale go to their small school there. There seem to be regular bake sales. The lady we chatted with at a small store there said she was from Ohio, her husband was from PA and he was thinking of moving back there to be nearer his family but she said that she was done moving around! Anyway I know that the Amish don’t farm as much as they used to for a number of reasons, land prices being the main one I guess. But in this area I heard or read somewhere that the land is just too steep to farm well without mechanized equipment. They’re on a plateau up there a bit but it’s still pretty rugged land.

    Amish in Giles County

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      Comment on Amish Businesses - Giles County VA (March 17th, 2012 at 17:23)

      Amish Businesses - Giles County VA

      Julie, it’s never too late to comment on one of these threads, I’m glad that you did. This community is in my top 5 Amish settlements I’d like to visit (not only for the bake sales!)

      For anyone interested, here’s a Giles County website with Amish business listings for the Pearisburg community…I’m just assuming it’s up to date, might be worth calling before you drive out of your way, unless you’re like me and don’t mind the risk of the occasional wild-goose chase :)

      http://gilescounty.org/amish.html

      Amish Businesses - Giles County VA

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    Karyn
    Comment on Giles County, VA Amish (October 10th, 2012 at 17:42)

    Giles County, VA Amish

    I am quite a bit late in commenting on the Giles County Amish. I live extremely close to the Amish settlement. I see them frequently. They are definitely alive and well. Some have moved due to a split in the church but many have stayed and are doing well for themselves. They have fundraisers frequently throughout the summer and fall for their school. The land in the area is good for farming as it lies beside the creek with beautiful mountains around.

    Giles County, VA Amish

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