21 responses to 5 Amish Publications You Might Enjoy (And How To Get Them)
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    Christy
    Comment on 5 Amish Publications You Might Enjoy (And How To Get Them) (May 22nd, 2015 at 06:19)

    Don’t forget:

    “Die Botschaft”
    420 Weaver Road
    Millersburg, PA 17061

    I’ve received the Connection for a few years now and I really enjoy the articles and like Erik said some are personal and reflective. That is probably what draws me more.

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    Roy Terry
    Comment on Another Amish Publication (May 22nd, 2015 at 06:35)

    Another Amish Publication

    To your list I would add Raber’s Almanac. Some of it is printed in German, but the bulk of its contents is in English. The Almanac’s main value to us English is its Minister’s List, which provides the names and addresses of bishops, deacons, and preachers in every church district in the U.S. and Ontario.

    The Almanac can be purchased in some Amish stores and I’m sure by mail from Aden B. Raber, 2467 CR 600, Baltic OH 43804. The 2015 edition cost me about $2.00 or $2.50.

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    colleen
    Comment on 5 Amish Publications You Might Enjoy (And How To Get Them) (May 22nd, 2015 at 07:36)

    Below is the website and they have a link where you can view a sample copy.
    http://www.plaincommunities.com/

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      John
      Comment on PCBE (May 22nd, 2015 at 13:55)

      PCBE

      For only $15.00 for a year I think this is a very educational publication. With a lot of business to business articles. They have the option to subscribe on their website now.

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    John
    Comment on The Budget (May 22nd, 2015 at 10:10)

    The Budget

    I pick up a copy of this every time we shop in Walnut Creek, or at one of the local “Amish marts” in our area of Freeport, Ohio.

    Thanks for the list, and all the additions from readers, 4 of these I never knew of and am going to look at!

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    Trish in Indiana
    Comment on 5 Amish Publications You Might Enjoy (And How To Get Them) (May 22nd, 2015 at 10:17)

    You know, one of my sisters and I recently discussed how when one interacts with the Amish (and now, I see, when one reads publications written and read by them), one does not get the impression of someone with “only an eighth grade education.” I find it easy to forget that I am speaking to someone who concluded formal education at a point when I was less than halfway through mine.

    I think, of course, some of the reason is that there are other factors involved when an “English” person in our country drops out of school in eighth grade, so what we think of as an eighth-grade dropout is not an intelligent person with a healthy mental attitude who is competent to function as a productive member of mainstream society. The difference is about more than whether the person has, say, studied trigonometry or taken the SAT. And some of the difference is doubtless that the Amish education system is designed to ensure that eighth grade graduates have all the basics needed for life in their community and even for interaction with ours.

    But I wonder if some of it is also that Amish life is a more literate one, on average, than ours has come to be. How many English households no longer subscribe to a newspaper or magazine? How many English children never see their parents read a book? How many English teens are never invited into a discussion about complex issues of moral decision-making? And of course, how many of our eighth-grade dropouts are fluently bilingual and to some extent bicultural? There is a lot of mental stimulation in the mainstream of Amish life. I think it is easier in our society to be a “dropout” from intellectual discourse, no matter what one’s level of education.

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      colleen
      Comment on 5 Amish Publications You Might Enjoy (And How To Get Them) (May 22nd, 2015 at 11:13)

      You are comparing an Amish 8th grade education to an American 8th grade Common Core education. There is no comparison. Additionally the Amish start working at approx aged 14, then start paying rent & food to their parents.

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    Donna J
    Comment on 5 Amish Publications You Might Enjoy (And How To Get Them) (May 22nd, 2015 at 12:47)

    I just sent off for a subscription to Family Life!!

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    Forest in NC
    Comment on 5 Amish Publications You Might Enjoy (And How To Get Them) (May 22nd, 2015 at 13:05)

    I take the Budget. They actually have a waiting list now for new community scribes.

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    Al in Ky
    Comment on 5 Amish Publications You Might Enjoy (And How To Get Them) (May 22nd, 2015 at 13:15)

    I have read and subscribed to The Budget for many years. It is a large newspaper, both in size of the pages, and number of pages (usually at least 40 pages every week). I have found that I can “skim over” quite a bit of the news that tells where church was held last Sunday, what ministers and visitors attended church, etc. Yet there is a lot of interesting news about things like where new Amish settlements are developing, when an Amish community is undergoing changes, etc. There are about 12 scribe’s letters I always read because each has such an interesting style of
    writing. The Budget will celebrate its 125th Anniversary this summer with a celebration and program in Sugarcreek, Ohio.

    I have read several issues of The Connection. Most of the articles are very interesting, but I am often surprised to see an article or picture that does not seem Amish. I’ve also read several issues of Family Life and think your description of it gives a good picture of what it is like. I think the publishers should be commended for only charging $11 a year.

    Another publication I regularly read is Truck Patch Connection, a monthly several page newsletter with articles by Amish and Old
    Order Mennonite produce farmers in several states. Christy Otto,
    Amish artist from Topeka, Indiana, always has a picture in every issue and I think the pictures themselves are worth the price of
    the publication, which is very reasonable.

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    Mary Yoder
    Comment on 5 Amish Publications You Might Enjoy (And How To Get Them) (May 23rd, 2015 at 15:06)

    5 Amish Publications You Might Enjoy (And How To Get Them)

    Hey Erik, nice of you to include us, interesting to read the comments. You are dealng with ppl who want to read about strict old order..so I am ready to see what they say. There are also ppl who like to see the gory-est accident scenes, right? lol

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    Linda
    Comment on Farming Magazine (May 25th, 2015 at 11:44)

    Farming Magazine

    If you are interested in a quarterly magazine that focuses on small-scale farming, Amish Bishop David Kline is the editor of Farming Magazine.

    Farming Magazine
    P.O. Box 85, Mt. Hope, OH 44660
    800-915-0042
    www.farmingmagazine.net

    You can view a sample copy of the magazine.
    There are 4 issues per year.

    Print Subscriptions as of May 2015:
    $18 for one year, $32 for two years, United States.
    Canadian and Foreign Order prices available.
    They also have an Electronic Version of Farming Magazine for $10 a year.

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    Rebecca
    Comment on 5 Amish Publications You Might Enjoy (And How To Get Them) (May 25th, 2015 at 14:17)

    How about KEEPER”S AT HOME ? It is a great encouraging magazine for Christian women. It is published by Carlisle Printing. It comes out 4 times a year. Many inspiring articles and helpful hints.You can even find back issues on Amazon and E-bay.phone number for Carlisle :1-800-852-4482.

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    Mark – Holmes County
    Comment on 5 Amish Publications You Might Enjoy (And How To Get Them) (May 27th, 2015 at 15:11)

    Did you ever cover the monthly newspaper “Plain Interests”? I would include an address & subscription fee if I had it, but we are not getting it anymore.

    • I haven’t Mark, though I’ve read the paper before, and I know the guy who gave it its name (he lives in Holmes) :)

      It would be a good one to cover. I don’t know if they have an email address though since I think, as the name suggests, it’s a bit plainer.

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      Al in Ky
      Comment on 5 Amish Publications You Might Enjoy (And How To Get Them) (May 27th, 2015 at 20:02)

      I read Plain Interests, but get my copies from a friend after he has read them, so the latest copy I have is the Dec. 2014 issue.
      Here is the mailing address, cost, etc. as listed in the Dec. 2014 issue. I didn’t find any email address in the publication.

      Plain Interests
      420 Weaver Road
      Millersburg, Pa. 17061

      One year or one subscription: $16 in the U.S, $25 in Canada
      Two years or two subscriptions: $15 each in U.S., $24 each in Can.

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    John
    Comment on Plain Interests is gone? (July 12th, 2015 at 19:28)

    Plain Interests is gone?

    I use to get this, but after 4 issues I never seen another one…..I don’t mind losing the $$, since it is going to support a plain lifestyle, but I would like to know what happened to it.

    Out of all of them mentioned this one was the most down to earth in writing style, like sitting across form a friend shooting the breeze…

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      Mary Yoder
      Comment on Plain Interests is Gone (July 13th, 2015 at 08:05)

      Plain Interests is Gone

      John, please don’t just do without, there is a reason, and they need to know. we have a magazine an the last thing we want ppl to do is just stay quiet about it, ya can’t fix it without knowing… Okay?>

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    Comment on Amish wholesale (September 29th, 2015 at 22:39)

    Amish wholesale

    I would like to see if there are listed of amish wholesale folk for my new country store

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