Catch up on the 25 most recent comments at Amish America


What's your favorite Amish community?

Comment #336605 by Philip on 17.11.18, 20:43

I think the Amish in Lancaster are my favorite Amish community, I have make an annual visit and find it a wonderful place to visit. The opportunity to
interact with the Amish is very limited but I understand the reasons

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Your Amish Questions Answered (Part 2)

Comment #332531 by Mary g on 16.11.18, 19:04

Amish family trying to mess with my land . My husband passed away and immediately they cut wood off my land. Beside them I am 80 years old and they have lied about me and have lied that I contacted them by phone to do this and clean out my sheds.

View post and comment here: Your Amish Questions Answered (Part 2)


Amish Autumn Scenes, Pumpkins, Halloween and More (29 Photos)

Comment #331710 by Anna Kinser on 16.11.18, 14:05

The Short Answer:
Not anymore.

Explanation:
I was born on the 70’s in a little town in Maine. We lived in a community of Christians. One of them, one of my Mom’s best friends, even drove a horse and buggy. We went to church every Sunday and my parents often read from the Bible each night or had friends over and we would sing or have our own Bible study. We went to a Christian school. We weren’t Amish, but we did a lot of the same things. We even had an outhouse and a wrought iron wood stove that we would use to heat the house, cook with and also to heat water for our baths. Each Halloween, my parents (mostly my Mother) would dress my brother and I in innocent, home made costumes. We were never any sort of ghoul or witch. We were always something like, a cowboy and a princess. We went to Halloween functions that our town orchestrated every year. It seemed completely innocent. It was fun. We went bobbing for apples, went on hay rides and played other games appropriate to our age.

The older I got, Halloween was more commercialized, just like Christmas and Easter. But, because I was already in the mindset that Halloween was innocent and fun, I didn’t really notice that it got darker and more evil until about 10 years ago. We had moved all over the US and I saw and participated in Halloween even as an adult.

When I was in high school I would hear about how every year some of the other kids would TP the principals house or leave paper bags of dog poo and set them on fire on peoples door steps. I guess as a trick.

Back then, when we got our candy spoils, my favorites were the peanut butter cups, kit kats and bazooka bubble gum. Least favorite was the bit-o-honey or sugar daddy’s.

Today, we don’t eat much junk. We make most of our treats using better quality ingredients. We eat healthy. My daughter loves kale.

About 7 years ago, I moved back east to where my Mom and brother and other step siblings lived, near the Amish in Indiana and I started to have a different view of Halloween. What once was my favorite holiday and the only holiday that I really enjoyed, had suddenly become my least favorite holiday. I was already Christian, but I had strayed away and then I became born again. Now, I have a 3 year old at the age of 47. She is my only child. I am having to explain to all of my relatives and friends about why my husband and I are not allowing our daughter to celebrate Halloween when everyone else does now as we did when we were younger. It’s awkward when we receive cute costumes that our friends and/or relatives might gift us and we have to remind them that we won’t be going out and she won’t be wearing it unless it can be used as a dress up at home situation. Like a princess in a castle in the 18th century or something.

We both feel that it is a holiday that God would not want us to participate in. It uses up resources. It is wasteful. It is harmful to our way of life. It is unnecessary. Looking back on it now, it would probably have been better if my parents would have put their feet down and said NO, you’re not participating in Halloween. Sure, we would have been the outcasts in school, but, maybe I wouldn’t’ve strayed from God in the first place.

We may seem like strict parents to many, but, we do not let our child watch anything that has magic in it, or Halloween, or even Christmas, because they are all about magic now. Even Easter is about magic now as far as mainstream society goes and has nothing to do with the real meaning. We do our best to gently remind our toddler that the “M” word is bad and not how God wants us to live. Halloween is all about the “M” word and we don’t watch or participate in anything having to do with the “M” word. So… pretty much all holidays are out, except for the birthday and we only really celebrate my child’s birthday. We do not give each other gifts on our birthdays. We do not expect gifts from others and tell others not to get us anything for our birthdays or Christmas because we don’t celebrate them. A simple Happy Birthday will do and maybe a nice home made meal.

View post and comment here: Amish Autumn Scenes, Pumpkins, Halloween and More (29 Photos)


The 5 Friendliest Amish Communities

Comment #331533 by Don Burke on 16.11.18, 13:15

Hello Mr. Miller. Erik forward your message to me, and I sent you an email directly in response. I should point out that I do not live in Forrest City — although I do consider myself to be a native Arkansan (from the Hope/Texarkana area). Instead, I live in the small community of Potosi, MO — not far from the St. Louis area.

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The 5 Friendliest Amish Communities

Comment #331403 by Erik/Amish America on 16.11.18, 12:29

Thanks for your email and kind comments Andy. I passed it along to Don. Just curious which Amish community you grew up in? Thanks for getting in touch.

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What Is An Amish Wedding Wagon?

Comment #331377 by Erik/Amish America on 16.11.18, 12:23

Agreed Donald, seems like a rather Amish solution to a practical problem (I’m using “Amish” in this case as a synonym for “practical” 🙂 ).

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What Is An Amish Wedding Wagon?

Comment #331373 by Erik/Amish America on 16.11.18, 12:22

Ken really neat to hear you went to the full wedding. Must be a special bond with your Amish friends. Thanks for sharing that here.

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What Is An Amish Wedding Wagon?

Comment #331368 by Erik/Amish America on 16.11.18, 12:21

That’s a good point Alex. As the article I linked says year in advance, perhaps that’s an inflated estimate…or yes, the wedding wagon people need to be tight-lipped! 😀

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What Is An Amish Wedding Wagon?

Comment #330775 by Donald Harris on 16.11.18, 09:25

This is great. Probably set up better than most English ways

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What Is An Amish Wedding Wagon?

Comment #330561 by Alex Knisely on 16.11.18, 08:15

…whoever owns the wagon is sitting on a high pile of secrets!

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The 5 Friendliest Amish Communities

Comment #328998 by Andy Miller on 15.11.18, 22:14

Erik
I grew up Amish and left at the age of 18. We my wife and I live in Sherwood, Arkansas. At this time I am 79 yoa and would like very much to make contact with Don Burke in Forrest City, AR. I have a very dear friend that also lives in Forrest City that I go and visit when I can. Would like to make contact with Don Burke if possible. Erik you may pass on my email to Don if you have his email so that he would be able to make contact with me. I have always had good relationships with my family members that are still Amish. Very interesting to read and view other readers comments.

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Halloween Questions Revisited

Comment #328541 by Anna Kinser on 15.11.18, 19:48

The Short Answer:
Not anymore.

Explanation:
I was born on the 70’s in a little town in Maine. We lived in a community of Christians. One of them, one of my Mom’s best friends, even drove a horse and buggy. We went to church every Sunday and my parents often read from the Bible each night or had friends over and we would sing or have our own Bible study. We went to a Christian school. We weren’t Amish, but we did a lot of the same things. We even had an outhouse and a wrought iron wood stove that we would use to heat the house, cook with and also to heat water for our baths. Each Halloween, my parents (mostly my Mother) would dress my brother and I in innocent, home made costumes. We were never any sort of ghoul or witch. We were always something like, a cowboy and a princess. We went to Halloween functions that our town orchestrated every year. It seemed completely innocent. It was fun. We went bobbing for apples, went on hay rides and played other games appropriate to our age.

The older I got, Halloween was more commercialized, just like Christmas and Easter. But, because I was already in the mindset that Halloween was innocent and fun, I didn’t really notice that it got darker and more evil until about 10 years ago. We had moved all over the US and I saw and participated in Halloween even as an adult.

When I was in high school I would hear about how every year some of the other kids would TP the principals house or leave paper bags of dog poo and set them on fire on peoples door steps. I guess as a trick.

Back then, when we got our candy spoils, my favorites were the peanut butter cups, kit kats and bazooka bubble gum. Least favorite was the bit-o-honey or sugar daddy’s.

Today, we don’t eat much junk. We make most of our treats using better quality ingredients. We eat healthy. My daughter loves kale.

About 7 years ago, I moved back east to where my Mom and brother and other step siblings lived, near the Amish in Indiana and I started to have a different view of Halloween. What once was my favorite holiday and the only holiday that I really enjoyed, had suddenly become my least favorite holiday. I was already Christian, but I had strayed away and then I became born again. Now, I have a 3 year old at the age of 47. She is my only child. I am having to explain to all of my relatives and friends about why my husband and I are not allowing our daughter to celebrate Halloween when everyone else does now as we did when we were younger. It’s awkward when we receive cute costumes that our friends and/or relatives might gift us and we have to remind them that we won’t be going out and she won’t be wearing it unless it can be used as a dress up at home situation. Like a princess in a castle in the 18th century or something.

We both feel that it is a holiday that God would not want us to participate in. It uses up resources. It is wasteful. It is harmful to our way of life. It is unnecessary. Looking back on it now, it would probably have been better if my parents would have put their feet down and said NO, you’re not participating in Halloween. Sure, we would have been the outcasts in school, but, maybe I wouldn’t’ve strayed from God in the first place.

We may seem like strict parents to many, but, we do not let our child watch anything that has magic in it, or Halloween, or even Christmas, because they are all about magic now. Even Easter is about magic now as far as mainstream society goes and has nothing to do with the real meaning. We do our best to gently remind our toddler that the “M” word is bad and not how God wants us to live. Halloween is all about the “M” word and we don’t watch or participate in anything having to do with the “M” word. So… pretty much all holidays are out, except for the birthday and we only really celebrate my child’s birthday. We do not give each other gifts on our birthdays. We do not expect gifts from others and tell others not to get us anything for our birthdays or Christmas because we don’t celebrate them. A simple Happy Birthday will do and maybe a nice home made meal.

View post and comment here: Halloween Questions Revisited


What Is An Amish Wedding Wagon?

Comment #328525 by Ken Tibbetts on 15.11.18, 19:39

My wife, Claudia and I have such close Amish friends that we were invited to the first one of their children’s weddings. It is truly an honor for English to be invited to the whole ceremony – not just the reception. It is a fairly long wedding ceremony – three hours sitting on hard benches. But it’s well worth it. We learned a lot from the experience. We felt that we had nine Amish grandchildren and now that the oldest boy (now a man with a beard) is married, his wife is a another granddaughter, making a total of 10 Amish grandchildren. We are all one big happy family! We are now looking forward to going to at least two more weddings within the next couple of years for our two oldest Amish granddaughters.

I can’t explain the love between us and our Amish family; we all know that the love is there and we know how to show it.

View post and comment here: What Is An Amish Wedding Wagon?


'Almost Amish' To Enforce Quilt Copyright, Stop Sales

Comment #324791 by Sharon Smith on 14.11.18, 23:21

I just won’t be ordering any patterns offered by this company. I do not want to encourage their actions in any way.

View post and comment here: 'Almost Amish' To Enforce Quilt Copyright, Stop Sales


Amish Autumn Scenes, Pumpkins, Halloween and More (29 Photos)

Comment #324509 by Mary on 14.11.18, 21:36

I Appreciate your belief to which you are entitled to , but Halloween is related to Satan and things involving evilness and you can see it everywhere and in almost everything from movies, to Halloween costumes and etc . God tells us these things are wrong in His word and that we are to not have any part in them . We Christian’s should know this . We need to study about the things that come into our homes that can release demonic influences in our lives . I’m sorry but I don’t mean any disrespect to you about this , this is how I feel about it , even though I let my 6 children do Halloween when they were youngsters , but have done a lot of study since on the subject . My husband and I admire the Amish very much , and understand why they live as they do, so much to the point that I’ve learned a lot of good advice from them. If I have misunderstood you please let me know . God Bless You . Mary Collins

View post and comment here: Amish Autumn Scenes, Pumpkins, Halloween and More (29 Photos)


Amish Couple Sues Federal Goverment Over Photo Citizenship Requirement

Comment #323815 by George DeVos on 14.11.18, 16:51

Yes, terrorists really hate to have their pictures taken. How a photo ID keeps a terrorist from committing terrorism is a mystery to me. Terrorism is a handy excuse for various trespasses on our privacy and on our freedom to be left alone. My parents response about harmless non-conformity was “well it’s a free country”. Not so much anymore. Can you say “Patriot Act”?

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3 Life Lessons From The Amish (According To A Lancaster Mennonite Pastor)

Comment #323739 by Doris Sigg on 14.11.18, 16:20

I wrote an article for a local broadsheet publication that caters to tourists of Amish Country in Holmes County, Ohio.

View post and comment here: 3 Life Lessons From The Amish (According To A Lancaster Mennonite Pastor)


Amish wood businesses: Furniture craftsmen, carpenters, sawmills and more

Comment #319496 by David Kremers on 13.11.18, 10:47

I have several tall straight Ash trees, and a maple already felled. Looking for somebody to clean up. You may keep all the wood. Baldwinsville New York (315) 420-3849

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Green Meadow Houses & Feeders of Shipshewana, IN

Comment #316250 by Linfda Redford on 12.11.18, 15:09

We were in Shipshewana this week on a bus tour and I regret I didn’t purchase some of your bird houses for my family for Christmas gifts. I’ve looked on line but do not see all the ones I saw while there. I would like very much to purchase some of the colorful bird feeders.

Looking forward to your response!

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The Amish of Somerset County, PA (25 Photos)

Comment #316223 by Louise Maust on 12.11.18, 14:49

My husband is a direct descendant of Jacob Maust, specifically Ronald Maust in California.

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Amish Builders

Comment #315920 by CIA SERVICES on 12.11.18, 12:06

Hi Ryan Gifford,
This fact sheet contains legal, operational and business issues relevant to the building and construction industry, which includes businesses in residential and non-residential construction. It covers services such as building structure, installation, heavy and civil engineering, land development and site preparation. otherwise you may have face problems due to the inexperience of labour by a construction company .
Thanks

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Amish Business Directory

Comment #312470 by Nicole on 11.11.18, 16:33

How do you become Amish were do you sign up or who do you talk to?

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The 4 Northeastern States With An Amish Population (2018)

Comment #311170 by Debra on 11.11.18, 08:26

It would be a wonderful thing but there is no way. The state of Rhode Island is densely populated, small and I could never see horse & buggy’s even being allowed.
People drive fast and what few semi-rural backroads they are windy and narrow. Accidents occur on a regular basis such as people hitting trees etc.
Being from New England I am so happy they are now in Maine and Vermont, lots of very nice farmland and much that has been abandoned from farmers of long ago whose children did not want that kind of life. So so many dairy farms now closed, beautiful old barns just sitting empty. Rural with roads that can accommodate horse and buggy’s.
Northern New Hampshire would also be a great area.
But Rhode Island no way.Far Western Massachusetts but farther up north would be better choices such as Maine, Vermont and New Hampshire. Beautiful country it is.

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Amish fiction characters--stereotypes in Plain clothing?

Comment #306989 by Sumac on 09.11.18, 19:49

I had to laugh when I remembered the last paragraph to my post above:

“I live for the day someone writes a good literary novel, with a great conflict and nice pace, beautiful imagery and language, and treats the Amish as what they are – fascinating, deeply Christian, complex human beings, who sometimes make horrible mistakes, and sometimes do wonderful selfless things, trying to make it in a hostile world like the rest of us.”

Well, I’ve found it. I am reading a book by Serena B. Miller, and I wanted to stop by here and highly recommend her to everyone. She is a pastor’s wife, grew up in Ohio Amish country, and is a personal and close friend to several Amish families. She writes of Old Order and Schwarzentruber Amish with a degree of detail and authenticity that I have not encountered. Also, speaking as an editor, she is a superb writer. Her book is rich, complex, musical, well-structured and well-edited. And it’s a bang-up great story that treats Amish culture with respect and realism – neither misrepresenting, demonizing, nor romanticizing. Really a treat to read.

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How do readers choose Amish novels?

Comment #306967 by Susan on 09.11.18, 19:41

This is to KimH and Gus Jones, and anyone who finds it interesting. I am a published writer, and a full-time editor as well. I am involved in helping new writers market their books, whether through a traditional publisher, or other means. I can assure you that many female-name romance writers are actually men, and sometimes vice-versa. Yes – you read that right. I agree with Kim that women writers often have a softer, more emotional style; the men tend to be realists and write grittier stuff. Of course there are exceptions to that general rule. The same happens in mystery novels – those written by men tend to be much better structured and much more based in finer crime details; women write emotion. Whether the PC crowd admits it or not, our brains are wired differently. I tend to really enjoy more “male” writing and I’ve been told my own writing has a more male voice. But I’m the exception I guess. I find a lot of Amish fiction strikes me as very teenager in tone – even when the main characters are in their 20s. I don’t find that authentic and when I encounter a writer doing that as an editor, in a “romance” novel, I help them correct it to a more mature voice. Gus, you are partly right, but you assume Christian publishing house exist and have more power than they do. You’re correct that it is a business, regardless of genre, and you can’t blame them for having marketing considerations and looking at trends – yes, they have to make money like any other business. But today many novels are independently published, meaning the traditional publishers are less involved. As for Amish novels, it’s probably accurate to say that much of the time it is an author writing not only a subject they enjoy (regardless of the extent to which it actually has anything to do with real Amish experience), but one that can make them some money. A novel is incredibly hard work to write and market, and they do need to – and deserve to – make some cash.

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