Catch up on the 25 most recent comments at Amish America


What's a good gift for an Amish baby?

Comment #178460 by Loretta Shumpert on 23.01.18, 22:05

I was spending the day with my amish friend and her daughter and daughter-in-law. Both were new mothers. We went to the outlets in Lancaster County. Both the daughter and d-i-l were buying blankets as baby gifts for someone else. When we left that store they pulled the blankets out to show us. No pretty pink or blue or yellow. Both had chosen a blanket of gray and white. I felt like that was due to them being OOA whereas I would have gotten something more colorful, not thinking. They themselves wear some pretty colorful dresses, all of them except my friend who tends to wear mostly dark dresses.

If you want to get something for the other kids some appropriate stickers would be nice. I asked one time what I could buy for her youngest who was turning five years old and she said stickers.

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6 Things You Might Not Know About Buggy Accidents

Comment #178458 by Ren Semans on 23.01.18, 21:36

OldKat, I agree with you and especially how eloquent you wrote.

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5 Interesting Facts About Pennsylvania Dutch

Comment #178456 by OldKat on 23.01.18, 20:31

Thanks for the additional information Oliver. It was my understanding that there is officially no longer a region called Alsace, nor the alternative German spelling. That could be incorrect, or a misunderstanding on my part though. I have been known to be wrong in the past!

I guess languages die out for a variety of reasons. Lack of usage is an obvious reason. The town we live in was settled predominately by people of German descent, though they spoke what is now considered to be the “Standard” German dialect rather than one of the “High” German dialects such as my mothers family and my fathers maternal side spoke.

When we moved there in 1985, one of the first things I noticed was that any time there was a gathering of any sort where several
“elderly” people were present they would invariably speak German for at least part of their conversation.Now we moved there in our early 30’s; so what I thought was “elderly” at that time might not be what I think of as being “elderly” today!

Regardless, around 10 to 12 years ago I suddenly realized that it had been quite some time since I had heard German spoken in public in our community. It took me a little while to realize that many of those people that I thought of as “elderly” in 1985 were by now truly elderly, many of them possibly deceased. I guess the bottom line is that the generation that was bilingual in German and English in our community is either now so elderly that they are no longer getting out much, or, they have passed away.

Regardless, for all intents and purposes German is no longer spoken publicly in our town.

BTW: NOT being a linguist of any sort, I am curious about that little symbol at the end of the Germanized spelling of “Alsace”. What is that symbol called? What does it mean? How in the world do I find that symbol on a keyboard?

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What's a good gift for an Amish baby?

Comment #178454 by Cheri on 23.01.18, 19:38

Just last month I had to buy a baby gift for an Amish friend from PA (they live in Narvon). It was their first baby and after searching many hours on the internet, I ended up going with a very large pack of diapers (plain white ones). I figured that even if she has too many, I’m pretty positive there will be another baby on the way soon enough and she could use them for the next baby. She had mentioned that they do use disposable diapers when they go out. I am in Connecticut, so it was easy to use Amazon to buy and ship the diapers. I also thought that a Walmart gift card would be good. I normally wouldn’t give a such an impersonal gift, but I truly believe that the Amish would appreciate a gift like that (gift card).

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6 Things You Might Not Know About Buggy Accidents

Comment #178447 by Tom Vogel on 23.01.18, 14:08

This Is Not About Everyone Else!

Individual driving habits IS NOT what this article is about. The LAW deals with that and has for decades.

Delicate commentators on this thread are clouding this elemental issue by turning the readers’ attention from physical safety markers to, “It’s about everyone else who is automatically presumed irresponsible and totally at fault, as if the Amish are incapable of making their buggies legally road worthy… Why? For their ultimate reasoning, “We interpret it (I cringe writing this…) as a directive or interpretation of God’s plan for them.”

Even though drivers are alert and driving within the legal speed limit our delicate commentators think everyone, that is EVERYONE should just drop well below the posted speed limit because there might be a child dressed in gray or black walking around in the black of night or a buggy out here with a confusing noncompliant light somewhere in the road and we need to be sensitive to their spiritual interpretations.

This is Utterly incredible insulting Amish community intelligence with these crippling excuses. It’s pathetically reprehensible that a simple answer so obviously beneficial as “getting legal for safety’s sake” is diverted by “cultural remorse that paralyzes anyone in this culture from doing anything correctly and predictable. Anyone who would take a clear, concise solution to a clear and dangerous situation is deserving of the title, “SNOWFLAKE.” It is as if you clean your glasses with salad dressing!

Clear, visual, safety markers on all vehicles is the law. Why? Safety, Everyone’s safety, including mine AND including the delicate ones here who are just as capable of having an accident as anyone else. My Amish friends– You want to be out on the road? Then get the right lights like everyone else. Prevent the loss of your family’s future and mine! And if that goes against your interpretation of God’s plan, I would challenge you that God never intended for a horse drawn buggy to be on an asphalt highway in the first place. Stick to Cow Paths.

How does your View of “Singular Slice of Impatient American Drivers” save the lives of the Amish in buggies OldKat? Do you and the other cultural apologists here REALLY think it is too difficult for the head of the Amish Family to slap legal lights and reflectors on his buggy instead of confusing solid amber lights?! Really?…………..

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What's a good gift for an Amish baby?

Comment #178442 by Beth Russo on 23.01.18, 12:43

Great question!! We bought all the makings for ice cream sundaes for everyone (but make sure they’re home or they may not have a place to keep the ice cream cold), pizza gift certificates (gotten in town at local places), bubbles, colored pencils, and paper for the older ones, and diapers for the baby. It’s so hard to know what to do so I asked my Amish friend when we brought the gifts. She said diapers are always good because they used cloth and disposable when they go out. I think a meal is always good for a break when there’s a new baby. Oh, and Wal-Mart gift cards – the Amish near us love Wal-Mart!

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What's a good gift for an Amish baby?

Comment #178441 by Alex Knisely on 23.01.18, 12:22

A set of the LITTLE HOUSE books.

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What's a good gift for an Amish baby?

Comment #178433 by Ashley on 23.01.18, 09:44

kid’s Tupperware, battery operated nightlight, hooded towels, baby soap

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What's a good gift for an Amish baby?

Comment #178431 by Erik/Amish America on 23.01.18, 08:46

Neat, thanks for sharing Carolyn!

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What's a good gift for an Amish baby?

Comment #178430 by Erik/Amish America on 23.01.18, 08:46

Great ideas, thanks Judith!

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What's a good gift for an Amish baby?

Comment #178428 by Judith Stavisky on 23.01.18, 08:27

A home made dinner like a big lasagna or roast chicken enough for the entire family is always appreciated. Thick baby towels are a treat in Amish homes. I have also purchased small gifts for the other children celebrating their new sibling (markers, crayons, etc.) which was also welcomed.

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What's a good gift for an Amish baby?

Comment #178427 by Carolyn on 23.01.18, 08:23

I gave an Amish baby a very fancy pink gown with matching panties, blanket, silver rattle,hat and booties.

The family was thrilled and I received a very nice thank you note in time.

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5 Interesting Facts About Pennsylvania Dutch

Comment #178426 by Oliver on 23.01.18, 08:12

you should make it more clear that the Alsatian you mention is one dialect of the German language,
spoken in the Region of Elsaß
but is now a part of France (re-named as “Alsace”).
Straßburg (which is the seat of the EUROPEAN parliament now)
was one of the most important German (ethnic and culture) towns of medieval Germany.
Nowadays, though there are many German villages, but the strong national policy of France also provided for a higher percentage of the use of the French language in the region now.
So: some “Alsatians” nowadays speak fluent English, others fluent French!
Some Alsatian-German dialect is left there in the Elsaß region of France, spoken at home, or at some occasions.

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An Amish Beekeeper

Comment #178424 by Helen Curtis on 23.01.18, 07:32

Would an Amish beekeeper wear a beekeeping suit?

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5 Interesting Facts About Pennsylvania Dutch

Comment #178421 by OldKat on 23.01.18, 06:32

I agree with what you wrote Jim. My mothers family spoke Alsatian at home, in their business dealings and around their community … up until WWI. After that the usage of it, particularly in public was sharply curtailed. It was strictly forbidden in the public and parochial schools in their area.

My mother learned it after a fashion, but was never fluent in it. More like she could understand most of it, but was not comfortable speaking it. I wished that she had been truly bilingual, as I would have liked to learn it. That just wasn’t possible. I always thought that was a shame.

In the same way I thought it was shame when some of the Hispanic children that I grew up with told me that their parents discouraged them from learning Spanish. Something just doesn’t seem right with that. I think it would be hard to understand your own cultural identity if you couldn’t speak the language.

Now among the Hispanics that live in our area there is a strong resistance to learning English. What a change of mindset. There are women in our town that my wife has known for roughly 30 years that still speak no English. It makes me believe that they really don’t want to fully participate in the American experience. I get the impression that they view themselves as “temporary” Americans and not really interested in being fully involved in our community. Not sure how this could be viewed any differently.

BTW: Did you realize that there is no longer a region called Alsace in France? It is now just part of a larger area called Grande Est. From what I understand the use of the Alsatian language to conduct business or in education is forbidden.

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6 Things You Might Not Know About Buggy Accidents

Comment #178416 by OldKat on 23.01.18, 02:56

This article is especially interesting to me, because though I am not “Plain”, I do have driving horses. Ten, fifteen, twenty years ago I would think nothing of hitching a single or a team and taking a buggy, wagon or whatever out on the highway. Not anymore. People today will flat run over you; and it really doesn’t matter why they did it. Of course, not being Plain I have other transportation options. They don’t & I feel for them because of it.

Ren’s comment about “new” people moving to her area resonates with me. Our area is being inundated with people moving in from the big city, 60+ miles to the East (Houston), and it is easy to decry “those Houstonians” for their poor driving habits. Though the truth is the majority of people in Houston are from somewhere OTHER than Houston. In fact, they come there from all over the world. It is possibly the most International City in America … so who knows where they really come from? Besides, how does anyone really know if they even moved to our area from Houston or not anyway?

Really, though I think it is something else at work here: Impatience. I blame that on computers, more specifically the Internet. 20 years ago in our area, we all used a dial up modem & sat patiently while it squawked and squealed as it made connections. Then we clicked on an icon and waited and waited while it loaded. Now we all have high speed internet service and when we fire up the Mac or PC we are greatly put out if it doesn’t paint the desktop in 5 to 10 seconds, or less. Who in their right mind would wait 30 seconds for a web site to load? I WANT IT NOW!

We want to buy something that is not available locally we no longer fire up the Ford or Chevy and drive into the city to shop for it. We fire up the Dell or whatever and order it from Amazon. 3 to 5 days standard delivery? Heck no, I want here tomorrow. In some urban areas; order in the AM, it is on your porch that PM. Everything is RIGHT NOW, IMMEDIATELY, PRONTO! The Internet has taught us that this is a birthright, or so we have come to believe.

So we get out on the road and get to a four way stop. Who is going to wait their turn? No one under the age of about 30, I can almost assure you of that. Increasingly no one else is either. If you are at a Red light and it turns Green, you darn well better not proceed through the intersection without looking for that driver that is going to stretch that Amber light into about 2 to 3 seconds of the Red light; because they are there and they will run slap over you. Why?: Impatience. Everything is RIGHT NOW, IMMEDIATELY, PRONTO!

My state has one of the longest borders in the world between a First World nation and a Third World nation and I can tell you from having been there a lot (as a youth, too dangerous to go there now) that Mexican drivers are very cavalier in their driving habits. It is like: I honked first, so I have right of way through the intersection … no matter the color of the light.

And, yes they bring those same driving habits with them to the US regardless of their legal status. But are their driving habits really any worse than the typical American driver? No, not really. Why?: IMAPTIENCE.

For years I have stopped any time I see a turtle crossing the highway. I put on the flashers, get out and scoop my little friend up and deposit him/her(?) on the other side of the road. My logic is that they didn’t ask us to come put up highways through their habitat, we did that on our own. Besides, it is not their fault that they are a quarter of a mile per hour(day?) creature in a 70 MPH world. If someone doesn’t help them they don’t stand a chance. It seems to me that the Plain people are in the same boat as my hard shelled friends. As a society we drive too fast, too aggressively and too carelessly for anybody’s good.

My 2 cents. Rant over.

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The Amish of Salem, Arkansas

Comment #178405 by lisa parks on 22.01.18, 20:50

i was told about a gentleman from salem who trained horses that was named amos barntrogger does any one know how I could get in touch with him thanks so much for any help lisa

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FAQ

Comment #178403 by Ginger Groff on 22.01.18, 18:31

This is in Manheim PA

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FAQ

Comment #178402 by Ginger Groff on 22.01.18, 18:30

My daughter has a barn with 4 stalls. She has 2 ponies, 1 horse and 1 miniature horse. She has hired people to help muck the stalls but they have been unreliable. I suggested she try and find an Amish boy in her area that would like to make some money. She has her own business and is so busy she really needs the help. I just don’t know how to go about finding someone.

Any suggestions?
Ginger Groff

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5 Interesting Facts About Pennsylvania Dutch

Comment #178389 by Erik/Amish America on 22.01.18, 10:41

Oliver, as for Dutch/Deutsch, this is the relevant bit from the article:

The Pennsylvania Dutch language — this can get confusing — is German, not Netherlands Dutch. It was spoken in the Rhine Valley and southwestern Palatinate region of what today is Germany.

“The average Pennsylvania Dutchman, if you dropped them in the Netherlands, would be lost,” Madenford said.

In Germany, Pennsylvania Dutch speakers could get by in most of the country the same way someone from Vermont could function in Dublin or the Louisiana bayou.

In America, there was an academic movement to drop the word Dutch and call the language Pennsylvania German, but one of the distinct traits of the region — stubbornness — won out.

“There was no country called Germany, and there was no national identity called German at the time these people were coming here,” Donmoyer said. “Culturally, there was an identity but it was very regional, not a national idea like there is today. One would be a Palatine, or a Swabian, or an Alsatian, or Swiss, etc.”

There’s a popular opinion that the word “Dutch” is a corruption of “Deutsch,” the word for the German language. When settlers were coming to Pennsylvania in the 18th century, Donmoyer said, the word “Dutch” was Old English for speakers of High and Low German, not a specific country.

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5 Interesting Facts About Pennsylvania Dutch

Comment #178373 by Jim Kramer on 21.01.18, 22:10

If you read my comments, you will notice I never suggestey the extreme view that people should be forced to speak only the English language or give up their culture. To get by in any country, however, and to enjoy the good things of the culture, that is, to live in it, not just briefly visit, knowing a way “in” is necessary. What is that way? Language. Please note in my comments: I am practically the East Coast Distributor of learn, maintain and enjoy languages plural!! I am living proof that you don’t have to gove up a language to gain another. I have just about all of the Amish German language prayerbooks, hymnals and the huge Märtyer Spiegel, and besides German and English I read and speak French and have a reading knowledge of Hebrew and Yiddish. I am also musical, a pianist, organist and trained singer, so add the language of music to it, and there I am. I am not suggesting giving up a blessed thing. Knowledge is precious, and I gained a lot through all of my languages. About culture: I have recipes and customs that hardly anyone makes or maintains any longer, and which many Americans might feel are foreign. Nobody ever told me I am not allowed to maintain them. By the way, my Linzertorte, Pfeffernüsse and Sandtörtchen get rave reviews at Christmas, and my Tsimmes I make for Thanksgiving they say is delicious as well

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5 Interesting Facts About Pennsylvania Dutch

Comment #178367 by Sheila Munro on 21.01.18, 15:18

So euroAmericans think everybody should learn English? Have they learned the local (ie Indian) language? English speakers should remembered that they are immigrants or descendants of immigrants!!

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Amish Quilts - Ohio

Comment #178364 by Kira on 21.01.18, 12:56

Hello Erik,

On my recent visit to Holmes County I discovered that the quilt shop ” Swartzentruber Quilts” in Millersburg, Ohio is closed, because unfortunately one of the sisters who operated it died some time ago. The other old lady could not keep up with all the work all by herself.

Greetings,
Kira

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Amish Cabins - Michigan

Comment #178363 by Curt on 21.01.18, 12:32

LOOKING FOR BUILDERS NEAR MANTON MI

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Amish Furniture Directory

Comment #178362 by Gene Hollander on 21.01.18, 12:07

Looking for hardwood bedroom/dining room makers with interest in manufacturing
unique styles in volume for retailers in northeast. Please contact leave message for Gene (GRH & Associates) over 25 years experience, 508-922-5066. We have designs
designs and marketing program. Details available. Great opportunity for all.

Thank you,

GeneHollander

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