Catch up on the 25 most recent comments at Amish America


Do Amish hunt?

Comment #186139 by Cate on 18.06.18, 15:36

You’re going to bash people without even checking that you spelled the insult correctly? Lovely.

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Buggy Accidents Continue Happening Too Often

Comment #186131 by Belinda James on 18.06.18, 15:29

My heart is breaking reading these horrible tragedies that occur. Equally disgusting is that our Amish are enduring harassment. We will have to pray for those who are enduring this ugliness as well as those who are perpetrating the harassment against innocent people. As far as the buggies, I feel they have every right on the road, and in fact, were around well before the car traffic. They actually should get priority in my own opinion. However, here is one word of advice I would like to give the Amish in all communities and it has to do with two buggies traveling in a row. This is HIGHLY DANGEROUS. A driver only sees one buggy in front of him and goes to pass. It is basically a surprise to see there are two buggies to pass. This is a recipe for disaster to the driver of the car, the buggies and their passengers, the horses and oncoming traffic too. Piece of advice to the Amish, please put distance between buggies, even if it means waiting for you to pull out into traffic.

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Buggy Accidents Continue Happening Too Often

Comment #186116 by Reggie on 18.06.18, 11:38

I love going to Lancaster. In particular bird-n-Hand, PA and Intercourse, PA areas. We typically stay at the Amishview Inn and Suites. We go around to the various shops and we see many buggies on the street. It is very precarious when there is a lot of traffic and those Amish buggy drivers have to negotiate turns with such heavy traffic on streets where there is no traffic light or stop sign. People seem to be in such a rush that they neglect to compensate their driving for a horse and buggy.

On the same note, however. We saw a guy driving a buggy and he was on a cell phone. I will never forget that image. Just like there are crazy or reckless automobile drivers, I wonder how many Amish are the same behind the reigns of a horse and buggy. It is such a sad thing to see accidents involving them, and we’ve seen many. However, we all need to watch out for each other on the road and give due respect. The Amish live there and should be given great respect on the road.

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Buggy Accidents Continue Happening Too Often

Comment #186113 by Rita on 18.06.18, 11:19

We live in a rural area with a lot of Amish buggies traveling the roads. Our area has lots of rolling hills and curves – beautiful to look at but dangerous when you’re driving a car at 30- 40 mph and come around a curve and find a buggy going 5mph in front of your car. Yes, we’re careful and we are looking out for them, but I am also surprised there aren’t more accidents, mainly because of the nature of our local roads.

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Buggy Accidents Continue Happening Too Often

Comment #186111 by Brett Sweeney on 18.06.18, 11:04

I live in Ohio about an hour away from Holmes County. When I drive through areas, such as Mount Eaton or Mount Hope, I’m keenly aware of the heavy buggy traffic on certain roads, especially State Route 241. I feel this is their “area” so I make sure I drive slow and cautiously. With the warm weather already here, buggies are out in droves. I feel there is a shared responsibility when it comes to buggies. The Amish usually drive with caution, and we should as well.

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Buggy Accidents Continue Happening Too Often

Comment #186109 by Robert H Ivy on 18.06.18, 09:23

My new neighbors in New York’s Champlain Valley are Swartzentrubers who refuse to even put orange triangles on their buggies. At night they hang a kerosene lantern on the road side of the buggy. The local police look the other way. No amount of pleading will get them to compromise for their own safety, even though the buggies are new to our roads, car drivers go too fast and drunk driving is way too common. They allow very young children to drive buggies and wagons on the road, which also is risky. Our summer tourist season is coming right up, with more car drivers on the roads who don’t know to watch for buggies. The Amish’s unbending and unreasonable adherence to their beliefs puts them, and others on the road, in danger. The police should enforce the laws and make the roads safer for everyone.

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Buggy Accidents Continue Happening Too Often

Comment #186108 by Steve on 18.06.18, 09:14

I’m surprised that there are so few buggy accidents.
With so many automobile drivers using cell phones and other destracting devices today, traffic accidents have gone way up all over the country. Whenever we drive down the road we see some person talking on their cell phone swerving around not paying attention to their surroundings. Even though here in tennessee it’s illegal to use a cell phone while driving, most people still use them. And police do not enforce the new laws. There have been stories in the news about more police getting into accidents because of the computer and phone systems that are in use in their vehicles today.
Also more states have enacted laws requiring elderly drivers to be retested regularly once they reach a certain age. Sounds like that’s what’s needed all over the country. If I was 83 and had killed someone with my vehicle accidentally, I would totally give up driving. I can’t believe that woman continued to drive after taking someone’s life. What a sick world we live in that we put our selfish pleasures above other people’s well being.

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Buggy Accidents Continue Happening Too Often

Comment #186107 by Hot Skillet on 18.06.18, 09:07

If drivers do not show respect for these people, the locality could make separate lanes for them, no motor vehicles allowed.
After all, it was not to long ago that every one used horses for transportation.

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Buggy Accidents Continue Happening Too Often

Comment #186106 by Donna Marie Taylor on 18.06.18, 08:44

I live in New York State around the Amish and would rather ride slowly behind that buggy work my flashers on than pass it. I’ve had horses and they can be unpredictable, no matter how well trained they are. I’m never in so much of a hurry to get somewhere that I put a human life or that of an animal in danger.

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Buggy Accidents Continue Happening Too Often

Comment #186105 by Debbie H on 18.06.18, 08:43

We live in a world of speed and instant gratification. Until non Amish learn to slow down and focus on their surroundings tragedies like these and others will continue to happen.

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Buggy Accidents Continue Happening Too Often

Comment #186104 by Judy Pasqualone on 18.06.18, 08:34

This makes me so very angry and sad that more caution is not apparent for respect for Amish people and their buggies. Or anyone for that matter!! People walking by the road or bicyclists etc….deserve extra caution. When driving a two or forty ton vehicle!!! I for one go on alert when nearing a pedestrian walking or on any type of transportation. But most expecially when traveling in a primary ahmish area! People…slow down….and proceed with caution!!! Horses can be spooked pulling these buggies!! Please show respect.

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Buggy Accidents Continue Happening Too Often

Comment #186103 by Robert on 18.06.18, 08:33

I have Amish that live around where I live. I have been in Shipshewana In. camping and have drove back to my campsite after dark on a Sunday night. It is a scary thing, lots of buggy’s with flashing lights and some have headlights. As you drive along you have to drive really slow because you see the flashing lights but can not tell how far away they are, then all of a sudden they are right there in front of you. That is bad enough, but some area’s of Amish are out after dark with no lights or slow moving vehicle signs on back of their buggy’s, even at 30 mph with a car they are almost impossible to see. I do agree drivers do need to slow down, because when I drive around Shipshewana on side roads most drivers past me like I’m standing still. I do fill that they should all at least have lights or a slow moving vehicle emblem, but flashing lights are better.

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An Amish America Q-and-A with Rumspringa author Tom Shachtman

Comment #186102 by Helen Curtis on 18.06.18, 08:29

I would like to read the rest of the article on Rumspringa

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10 Unusual Amish Communities

Comment #186070 by Al in Ky on 17.06.18, 15:03

Loretta — I would say that Pearisburg is about 125 miles southwest of Staunton. The bulk food store/deli would be an interesting place to visit; not sure how many home businesses there are at the present, not too many.
Also, I was in the community five years ago driving around for about two hours and I only saw one buggy — and it was in a shed. I think it would be worthwhile to go out of the way to visit if you contacted someone in the Amish community ahead of time and see if they could offer assistance in arranging a visit.

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Why are Amish targeted for harassment?

Comment #186064 by A on 17.06.18, 13:53

People who do such things, Amish or not, don’t deserve any respect:
https://www.facebook.com/laurie.manz/posts/1668259226574528

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At an Amish youth singing

Comment #186041 by startup business questions on 17.06.18, 05:53

WOW just what I was searching for. Came here by searching for conduct home

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When a son joins the Amish

Comment #186026 by M J on 16.06.18, 15:02

Yes, I agree, it is an easy choice; better the strictness inside than the corruption outside. It is for a very good reason they do not use english.

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When a son joins the Amish

Comment #186025 by Mariam Jensen on 16.06.18, 14:56

The Discovery channel is the one that makes LGBT stories and will no doubt turn your son’s family into a cult for the establishment to discredit them. Please, please do not do it.

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10 Unusual Amish Communities

Comment #186022 by Loretta Shumpert on 16.06.18, 12:12

Al,

When I drive to Lancaster County I come through the Shenendoah Valley, through Staunton, is Pearisburg fairly close by?

If it is, (within 20-30 miles) would it be worthwhile to go out of the way a bit as far as what you will see? I like to stop at a general store or at least see some horses and buggies. Any home businesses to stop at?

Thanks

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10 Unusual Amish Communities

Comment #186009 by Al in Ky on 15.06.18, 21:33

I enjoyed reading about these unusual Amish communities. Thanks, Katie Troyer, for your comments about Pinecraft. I did not realize that the Amish who live there use electricity and air conditioning. Pinecraft is on my “bucket list” to visit some day.

I especially enjoyed a visit to the Pearisburg community about five years ago. It was a little hard to find, since it is at least 20 miles southwest of Pearisburg. Sam and Lydia Chupp of that community write very interesting letters in The Budget newspaper almost every week and often include information about people who once lived in the community, but left, and have come back to visit. It seems like some of these people were at one time “Amish seekers”, as mentioned above in this post. From what the Chupps write, it seems like the bulk food store/deli is doing very good business, but is under different management than the previous store (I think it was called Nature’s Way).

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17 Questions For Anabaptist Seekers

Comment #186005 by Kimberly on 15.06.18, 20:17

Hello Osiah,
Thank you so much for responding to my post. I would very much appreciate some guidance from you regarding who to reach out to locally. I will post my email here as I am unsure of how to message through this site. My email is: knbradford72@gmail.com. If there is another way to message you that I am to use, I would appreciate direction on how to do so. I look forward to your reply.

Sincerely, Kimberly

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10 Unusual Amish Communities

Comment #186000 by Not now on 15.06.18, 18:01

Almost all communities use the horse and buggy as their first mode of transport except for Pinecraft. That includes “tractor settlements”. Probably the only other exception are a few smaller transitioning (i.e transition to Amish-Mennonite) settlements. There are several communities that are today transitioning similar to the way the Beachy Amish transitioned in the early 1900s and New Order in the 1960s. Some communities have become more liberal and slowly merged into broader society, while others became more conservative. It’s possible that “tractor settlements” will eventually merge with the Mennonites or New Order Amish at some point in the future. Does that mean the end of the Amish? I don’t think so. At least not if you base it on history. Splits, mergers, and transitions are a part of Amish history.

The Pinecaft Amish community is not a normal Amish community. It was always an unusual community: An Amish vacation spot, that overtime became kind of a summer home/retirement home community for certain Amish. I would even call it a semi-Amish community because of the fact that the majority of the Amish are themselves visitors from other communities.

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10 Unusual Amish Communities

Comment #185992 by Katie Troyer on 15.06.18, 14:09

I live in Pinecraft. All Amish use electricity. Those who live here year round use air conditioners.

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10 Unusual Amish Communities

Comment #185976 by Debbie Halcomb on 15.06.18, 08:44

Interesting articles. I read somewhere that Pinecraft allows the use of electric. I also read in that same article that some use the air conditioner and some don’t. Can you clarify this?

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Enjoy A Meal In A New York Amish Home (+7 Recipes)

Comment #185972 by Erik/Amish America on 15.06.18, 07:34

Ken If I had to choose one “category” of dish to eat forever (very hypothetical I know…), I might just go with casserole. Lot of variety there. Sounds like you have some good friends.

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